Wood is classified as an insulator and does not readily conduct electricity, but when wet, wood does have the potential to conduct electricity. Insulators resist the flow of electricity, as stated by the Occupational Saf... More »

Ionic compounds conduct electricity when dissolved in water because the movement of their negatively-charged and positively-charged particles forms an electrical current, explains About.com. In this liquid state, the cha... More »

The alkali metals, transition metals and metals in group 13, 14, and 15 on the periodic table all are malleable and good conductors of electricity Each of these groups has different characteristics, but all are able to c... More »

A conductor conducts electricity, and an insulator, or a dielectric, does not. A semiconductor falls between the two extremes and conducts less electricity than a conductor but more than an insulator. Siemens per meter (... More »

Silicon is typically a very poor conductor of electricity and often considered an insulator. However, a process called doping introduces a small amount of other material into the crystal structure to convert silicon from... More »

Glass is not a good conductor of electricity and is classified as an insulator not a conductor. An electrical insulator is any material that does not allow electrons and electric charge to flow freely. These materials ma... More »

Semiconductors are substances that conduct electricity only under certain conditions. Germanium, Silicon and sometimes tin are types of semiconductors that occur naturally and do not require chemical doping to form cryst... More »