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A homogeneous mixture is one where all the components are uniformly distributed and a heterogeneous mixture is one where the components have localized regions with different properties. The difference simply lies in how ... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry Solutions & Mixtures

The main difference between a heterogeneous mixture and a homogeneous mixture is the degree to which the materials are mixed together. Generally speaking, a heterogeneous mixture is less well integrated than a homogenous... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry Solutions & Mixtures

Heterogeneous mixtures that never settle are called colloids. Colloidal dispersions, as they are known in chemistry, remain evenly distributed without settling out. Examples include butter, milk, smoke, fog, ink and pain... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry Solutions & Mixtures
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The main difference between a heterogeneous mixture and a homogeneous mixture is the degree to which the materials are mixed together. Generally speaking, a heterogeneous mixture is less well integrated than a homogenous... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry Solutions & Mixtures

Air, syrup and rain are examples of homogenous substances, while pizza, blood and gravel are examples of heterogeneous ones. The components of homogenous substances are uniformly distributed in a single phase, while thos... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry Solutions & Mixtures

Heterogeneous and homogeneous mixtures are identified by the level at which the mixtures blend together. Visible indications of different components within a mixture denote a heterogeneous mixture, while a uniform, singl... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry Solutions & Mixtures

Orange juice with pulp is considered a heterogeneous mixture, while pulp-free orange juice is considered a homogeneous mixture. The presence of pulp determines what type of mixture the orange juice is. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry Solutions & Mixtures