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www.reference.com/article/dialect-poem-7e811253f43c75e1

Dialect in a poem is a literary tool that refers to the use of language that distinguishes the voice of someone from a unique culture, financial status or social class from others. Dialect can include specific grammar, spelling, pronunciations, vocabulary and slang term...

www.reference.com/world-view/dialectical-journal-51685a91e4e0dba0

The purpose of a dialectical journal is for the reader to write down interesting, memorable or important passages in a text as he reads literature. By writing about literature, the reader is able to make personal connections and interpretations.

www.reference.com/world-view/examples-dialectical-thinking-a79b3f691fff110a

Some examples of dialectical thinking include thinking of passivity and aggression, considering impulsivity and withdrawal, looking at love and hate as well as reviewing different answers to morality questions. Dialectical thinking is when a person examines or holds two...

www.reference.com/world-view/poetry-important-d5cd854f0e4bec39

Poetry is one of the most universal vehicles of human expression, and one of the most important of all written media for describing experiences. Research has also concluded that teaching students poetry offers measurable results in a wide set of linguistic domains.

www.reference.com/world-view/types-lyric-poetry-1b2d0caef2762e

The forms of lyric poetry include the lyric poem, sonnet, dramatic lyric, dramatic monologue, elegy and ode. A lyric poem is any poem spoken by just one voice that expresses that individual's state of mind, feelings, perceptions and thoughts.

www.reference.com/world-view/father-english-poetry-73cb9f897ab53ba8

Geoffrey Chaucer became known as the "Father of English Poetry" (or literature), primarily due to his groundbreaking work "The Canterbury Tales," which included a number of forms that went on to shape the English language for years after it was initially written. Chauce...

www.reference.com/article/examples-lyric-poetry-8bf978c55ece2d61

Examples of lyric poetry include: “To Anthea, Who May Command Him Anything” by Robert Herrick, “I Hid My Love” by John Clare, “Song for the Last Act” by Louise Bogan and “Vita Nova” by Louise Glück. The term "lyric" is derived from "lyre," a Greek instrument.