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The deaths of both Romeo and Juliet in William Shakespeare's tragedy were suicides, resulting from their feuding families' disapproval of their romance. Romeo kills himself by ingesting poison, when he thinks a drugged J... More »

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The climax in the play "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare occurs with the deaths of both Romeo and Juliet inside of the Capulet tomb. The climax happens in Act 5, Scene 3, and it is in the same scene that the prin... More »

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At the end of William Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet," both Romeo and Juliet commit suicide in tragic circumstances. Just before being married to Paris, an arranged suitor, Juliet's lifeless body is discovered and ... More »

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The most well-known apostrophe in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" occurs in Act 2 Scene 2, in which Juliet asks the absent Romeo, "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" Because an apostrophe can be defined as any time a ch... More »

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William Shakespeare's play "Romeo and Juliet" is still relevant in 2014 because people still suffer from forbidden, doomed or unrequited love and recognize the story as universal. Because the play captures the rashness t... More »

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William Shakespeare uses a metaphor in "Romeo and Juliet" when Lady Capulet compares Paris to a book. Two other examples occur when Romeo compares Juliet to the sun and when Paris compares Juliet to a flower and her tomb... More »

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William Shakespeare's play, "Romeo and Juliet," mentions in Act 4, Scene 4, "They call for dates and quinces in the pastry." This is the only specific mention of food in the play resembling the typical diet of upper clas... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics