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Crane flies are not venomous, and their bodies are not toxic. Many species do not eat as adults and lack mouth parts capable of piercing skin. The larvae can be agricultural pests, but the adults are harmless. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Flies

According to Virginia's Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS), crane flies do not bite. In fact, the Galveston County Master Gardener Association indicates that adult crane flies typically do not eat anything during the f... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Flies

The Ruppell's vulture, the highest-flying bird, can fly as high as 37,000 feet. The common crane and bar-headed goose have been observed flying over the Himalayas at heights of 33,000 feet and 29,000 feet, respectively. More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Birds
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According to Virginia's Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS), crane flies do not bite. In fact, the Galveston County Master Gardener Association indicates that adult crane flies typically do not eat anything during the f... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Flies

Common household fruit flies of the species typically found in kitchens and around ripening fruits do not bite. These insects, sometimes called vinegar flies, are attracted to fruit because of the vinegar released as a b... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Flies

Like all insects, flies have brains. Their brains consist of the protocerebrum, deutocerebrum and tritocerebrum. The fly's protocerebrum controls its compound eyes and its ocelli, which are a trio of simple eyes found be... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Flies

Regular house flies survive as larvae during winter by living in the decaying flesh of animals or other dead and decaying organisms that provide a suitable habitat during the colder months. While house flies survive by l... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Flies