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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizens_United_v._Federal_Election...

Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, 558 U.S. 310 (2010), is a landmark U.S. constitutional law, campaign finance, and corporate law case dealing with regulation of political campaign spending by organizations.

www.oyez.org/cases/2008/08-205

Citizens United sought an injunction against the Federal Election Commission in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia to prevent the application of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA) to its film Hillary: The Movie.

www.britannica.com/event/Citizens-United-v-Federal...

Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, case in which the U.S. Supreme Court on January 21, 2010, ruled (5–4) that laws that prevented corporations and unions from using their general treasury funds for independent “electioneering communications” (political advertising) violated the First Amendment’s guarantee of freedom of speech.

www.history.com/topics/united-states-constitution/citizens...

In Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commission (FEC), the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 2010 that political spending is a form of free speech that’s protected under the First Amendment.

publicintegrity.org/federal-politics/the-citizens-united...

For that, we need to look at another court case — SpeechNow.org v. FEC. The lower-court case used the Citizens United case as precedent when it said that limits on contributions to groups that make independent expenditures are unconstitutional. And that’s what led to the creation of the super PACs, which act as shadow political parties.

www.usnews.com/news/articles/2015/01/21/5-years-later...

In its Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission decision, the court opened the campaign spending floodgates. ... Thanks to Citizens United, supporters can make the maximum $5,200 donation ...

www.fec.gov/updates/citizens-united-v-fecsupreme-court

On January 21, 2010, the Supreme Court issued a ruling in Citizens United v.Federal Election Commission overruling an earlier decision, Austin v. Michigan State Chamber of Commerce (Austin), that allowed prohibitions on independent expenditures by corporations.The Court also overruled the part of McConnell v.Federal Election Commission that held that corporations could be banned from making ...

ballotpedia.org/Citizens_United_v._Federal_Election_Commission

Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission is a United States Supreme Court case involving Citizens United, a 501(c)(4) nonprofit organization, and whether the group's film critical of a political candidate could be defined as an electioneering communication under the 2002 Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, also known as the McCain-Feingold Act. ...

www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/09pdf/08-205.pdf

See United States v. Detroit Timber & Lumber Co., 200 U. S. 321, 337. SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED STATES Syllabus CITIZENS UNITED v. FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION APPEAL FROM THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA No. 08–205. Argued March 24, 2009—Reargued September 9, 2009–– Decided January 21, 2010

www.cga.ct.gov/2010/rpt/2010-R-0124.htm

Citizens United, fearing that Hillary would be covered under § 441b, sought an injunction in December 2007 against the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) in federal district court, arguing that § 441b is unconstitutional as applied to Hillary. The district court denied this motion and granted summary judgment to the FEC.