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www.iwm.org.uk/history/the-evacuated-children-of-the-second-world-war

The Second World War was a time of major upheaval for children in Britain. Over a million were evacuated from towns and cities and had to adjust to separation from family and friends. Here are 11 ways children were affected by the Second World War.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evacuations_of_civilians_in_Britain_during_World_War_II

The evacuation of civilians in Britain during the Second World War was designed to protect people, especially children, from the risks associated with aerial bombing of cities by moving them to areas thought to be less at risk. Operation Pied Piper, which began on 1 September 1939, officially relocated more than 3.5 million people.

www.historylearningsite.co.uk/world-war-two/children-and-world-war-two

World War Two was the first war when Britain itself was the target of frequent attacks by the enemy. With the success of the Battle of Britain and the suspension of ‘Operation Sealion’, the only way Germany could get at mainland Britain was to bomb it. This occurred during the Blitz and seemed to reinforce the government’s decision to introduce evacuation (what the government of the time ...

study.com/academy/lesson/world-war-ii-evacuation-of-children-facts-statistics.html

In World War II, the British government enacted Operation Pied Piper to evacuate civilians from the cities in preparation for German air raids. The main focus of these evacuations were children ...

www.primaryhomeworkhelp.co.uk/war/evacuation1.html

How many people were evacuated during the war? By the end of the Second World War around 3.5 million people, mainly children had experienced evacuation. No one was forced to go but parents were encouraged by posters and told that their children would be safer from German bombs if they moved to the country.

www.thehistorypress.co.uk/articles/the-evacuation-of-children-during-the...

Child evacuees from Bristol arriving at Brent in Devon in 1940 ... A UK Ministry of Health poster encouraging women to care for World War II evacuees Obviously, parents and children often missed each other. In the ‘Phoney War’ that followed the start of the Second World War, Hitler was not ready for a full-scale attack on Britain and France.

www.defensemedianetwork.com/stories/operation-pied-piper-the-evacuation-of...

Operation Pied Piper: The Evacuation of English Children During World War II By Dwight Jon Zimmerman - December 31, 2011 Children of an eastern suburb of London, who have been made homeless by the random bombs of Nazi night raiders, wait outside the wreckage of what was their home, ca. September 1940.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=0SYDBJAwYCI

Betty lived in Cardiff during the war and was evacuated to Aberdare. With her family friend, Anesha, she retraces the journey and describes what it was like ...

primaryfacts.com/1311/ww2-evacuation-facts

This label stated the child’s name, home address, school and destination. Although some evacuees didn’t enjoy their evacuation, many of the children adapted really well to country life. They became friends with the local children and, in many cases, stayed in touch with their host family after the end of World War 2.