In chemistry, an indicator is defined as a substance that undergoes distinct observable change when the conditions of its solution change. Litmus is the most commonly used indicator in the laboratory. More »

Iodine is known as an indicator because it changes color in the presence of starch and several other molecules. Iodine can also be used to track iodide and iodine in its elemental form. More »

A double indicator titration is the process used in chemistry experiments to determine and analyze the amount and concentration of acids or bases in a solution at two end points. For example, when titrating sodium carbon... More »

Phenolphthalein, an acid-base indicator used to test the pH of a solution, turns pink due to the presence of a weak base. The indicator itself is a weak, colorless acid that forms pink anions when it dissolves in water. More »

In chemistry, the term "hydrate" refers to a substance that contains water, while an anhydrous substance contains no water. Hydrates and anhydrates differ greatly in their reactions to water and their common uses. More »

In chemistry, the term "property" is frequently used to describe the attributes of a substance, such as density, oxidation, state of matter, mass, conductivity, color, bonding and many other traits. These properties are ... More »

A double indicator titration is the process used in chemistry experiments to determine and analyze the amount and concentration of acids or bases in a solution at two end points. For example, when titrating sodium carbon... More »