The only way to confirm a mole is cancerous is through tests administered by a doctor, such as biopsies, imaging tests and blood tests, according to the American Cancer Society. However, there are certain warning signs t... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Cancer

Cancerous moles are asymmetrical and larger than other moles. They are more than one color and sometimes bleed or ooze, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. The mole may also be scaly and itch; sometimes a n... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Cancer

Moles that have a different appearance when compared to other moles or that first occur after age 30 should be evaluated by a dermatologist. Any moles that change shape, size, height or color or bleed, itch, ooze or are ... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Cancer

Imaging tests, such as X-rays and computer tomography scans, and biopsies, such as a needle biopsy and a surgical bone biopsy, are some of the tests used to diagnose bone cancer, according to the American Cancer Society.... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Cancer

A physical examination by a physician, blood, urine and imaging tests, and biopsies can help detect early signs of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, states Mayo Clinic. There are no screening tests for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma as of... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Cancer

The most important sign a mole might be melanoma is a change in its appearance such as a change in shape, size or color, explains the American Cancer Society. Another sign of melanoma is a spot on the skin that looks dif... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Cancer

Individuals should see a doctor about signs or symptoms of exocrine pancreatic cancer when experiencing jaundice of the skin and eyes, pain in the back or abdomen, problems with digestion, and untended weight loss, state... More »