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www.reference.com/article/calvin-cycle-84bd503faae2198

The Calvin cycle is a metabolic process that uses the carbon from carbon dioxide, along with energy in the form of ATP, to produce sugar. This cycle takes place in the stroma of chloroplasts, which are found in plant cells.

www.reference.com/article/products-calvin-cycle-35c202445c22e16a

The final product of the Calvin cycle, the second metabolic cycle of photosynthesis, is the sugar glucose. Carbon dioxide joins with organic molecules to produce glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. After several glyceraldehyde-3-phosphates are produced from the cycle, they join...

www.reference.com/article/steps-calvin-cycle-663a72d389c11814

The Calvin cycle is comprised of three steps: carbon fixation, reduction and regeneration. The Calvin cycle is the light-independent reaction of photosynthesis that converts carbon dioxide into sugar (glucose) molecules.

www.reference.com/article/another-name-calvin-cycle-131fbba625ff3323

The Calvin cycle is also known as the dark reactions, C3 cycle, Calvin-Benson-Bassham (CBB) cycle, or reductive pentose phosphate cycle. The cycle was discovered in 1950 by Melvin Calvin, James Bassham and Andrew Benson.

www.reference.com/article/calvin-cycle-occur-fe29e1bb6e5d5ef

The Calvin cycle is a metabolic pathway that is found in the stroma of the chloroplast. Carbon enters the pathway in the form of CO2 and exits in the form of sugar.

www.reference.com/article/calvin-cycle-place-ceeeed16d61b7469

The Calvin Cycle is a component of the light-independent reactions that occur in the stroma region of chloroplasts. It is responsible for the conversion of absorbed carbon dioxide into sugars.

www.reference.com/article/happens-during-calvin-cycle-714e5f678457902c

The Calvin cycle is a metabolic process that occurs in the chloroplasts of plant cells. Its main function is to create sugar from carbon dioxide for the plant to use as a source of energy.