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In William Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar," Brutus is more of a philosopher motivated by idealism, while Cassius is a practical man guided by politics and power. Unlike Brutus, who genuinely believes in the virtues of... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

In the heated exchange between Brutus and Cassius in Act IV of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar," Brutus expresses rage with Cassius over several issues, however, he later admits his real reason for anger is that he has just... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Plays

Though these characters have been fictionalized in multiple stories, including Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar" and Dante's "Inferno," Brutus (Marcus Junius Brutus) and Cassius (Gaius Cassius Longinus) were real people... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics
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Though these characters have been fictionalized in multiple stories, including Shakespeare's play "Julius Caesar" and Dante's "Inferno," Brutus (Marcus Junius Brutus) and Cassius (Gaius Cassius Longinus) were real people... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

In the heated exchange between Brutus and Cassius in Act IV of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar," Brutus expresses rage with Cassius over several issues, however, he later admits his real reason for anger is that he has just... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Plays

In William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar," Brutus objects to the taking of an oath because he feels that honorable men engaged in a just cause should be trusted at their word. This plays into Shakespeare's development of ... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics

In the play "Julius Caesar" by William Shakespeare, Brutus fits the definition of a tragic hero. Marc Antony describes Brutus as the noblest Roman even after Brutus kills Caesar. Since Brutus did not kill Caesar out of e... More »

www.reference.com Art & Literature Literature Classics