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The boiling point of pure water is 212 degrees Fahrenheit at one atmosphere of pressure, or 760 millimeters of mercury. Such conditions are known as standard pressure. The boiling point is affected, however, when the pre... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

The boiling point for pure water is 212 degrees Fahrenheit and the melting point is 32 degrees. Pressure and the purity of the water can have an impact on the melting and boiling point. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

The boiling point of distilled water is 100 degrees Celsius or 212 degrees Fahrenheit. The boiling point of water can be higher or lower depending on several factors. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter
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The boiling point for pure water is 212 degrees Fahrenheit and the melting point is 32 degrees. Pressure and the purity of the water can have an impact on the melting and boiling point. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

Adding salt to water actually boosts the boiling point a few degrees, but even with the higher boiling point, salt water boils faster than pure water because salt water has a lower heat capacity than pure water. This mea... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

The additional molecules in milk keep its boiling point slightly higher than water, which boils at 100 degrees Celsius or 212 degrees Fahrenheit. The chemical composition of milk dictates the boiling point and so there i... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

At sea level, the boiling point of water is 212 degrees Fahrenheit, which is equivalent to 100 degrees Celsius. However, as with any liquid, water’s boiling point fluctuates slightly due to changes in altitude. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter