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Different liquids have different boiling points because each liquid has a unique chemical makeup that gives it an identifying vapor pressure. When the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the pressure of the atmosphere... More »

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The boiling point for liquid nitrogen is approximately -321 degrees Fahrenheit. Liquid nitrogen has a variety of uses but can be dangerous if not handled properly. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

An increase in atmospheric pressure raises the boiling point of a liquid by raising the vapor pressure of the water above the liquid. This increases the amount of thermal energy needed to increase the vapor pressure of t... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter
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An increase in atmospheric pressure raises the boiling point of a liquid by raising the vapor pressure of the water above the liquid. This increases the amount of thermal energy needed to increase the vapor pressure of t... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

The element Tungsten has the highest melting and boiling points of any known substance, melting at 6,192 degrees Fahrenheit and boiling at 10,031 degrees Fahrenheit. For this reason, Tungsten is used in many applications... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

Pure antifreeze, which is the chemical ethylene glycol, has a boiling point of about 388.4 degrees Fahrenheit. However, most coolants are made of a combination of ethylene glycol and water. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

The melting point of stainless steel varies according to the precise chemical makeup of the particular alloy, although the spectrum runs from 1,325 to 1,530 degrees Celsius. Melting range is important in the process of m... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter