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The boiling point for liquid nitrogen is approximately -321 degrees Fahrenheit. Liquid nitrogen has a variety of uses but can be dangerous if not handled properly. More »

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Different liquids have different boiling points because each liquid has a unique chemical makeup that gives it an identifying vapor pressure. When the vapor pressure of a liquid is equal to the pressure of the atmosphere... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

Most often, thicker liquids take longer to boil. Viscosity and boiling point are both physical properties that are determined by intermolecular forces. Although viscosity and boiling point do not directly affect each oth... More »

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The boiling point for pure water is 212 degrees Fahrenheit and the melting point is 32 degrees. Pressure and the purity of the water can have an impact on the melting and boiling point. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

The boiling point for normal heptane is about 98.3 degrees Celsius, which is equivalent to approximately 209.2 degrees Fahrenheit. The boiling point of a material is the temperature at which it changes states from liquid... More »

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The boiling point of gasoline ranges between 104 and 392 degrees Fahrenheit. The wide range of boiling points is due to the many different blends of components available to provide different characteristics such as highe... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

The boiling point of ethyl alcohol is 173 degrees Fahrenheit. Ethyl alcohol is also called ethanol or grain alcohol. Its chemical formula is C2H6O, and the molecular weight is 46.068 grams per mole. More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter