The best first aid for a bee sting, according to WebMD, includes removing the stinger, washing the area with soap and water, applying a cold compress to ease swelling and administering ibuprofen or acetaminophen for pain... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Wounds & Bruises

In the event of a single bee sting that doesn't cause an allergic reaction, the best course of action is to remove the stinger, wash the area, and apply ice or a cold compress, advises Mayo Clinic. Applying hydrocortison... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Bugs Stinging Insects

Ice is the best treatment for hornet stings because they are deeper than bee or wasp stings, so the sting is harder to treat, states HomeRemediesForYou.com. Ice slows the spread of the venom as well as reduces swelling a... More »

www.reference.com Health Insect & Animal Bites

For minor reactions to a bee sting, wash the area with soap and water, and for more severe reactions, apply ice and take an antihistamine, as stated by Mayo Clinic. With either reaction, avoid scratching the area, and it... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Wounds & Bruises

If someone with a history of anaphylaxis or other acute allergic reactions is stung by a bee, WebMD recommends immediately calling 911. This is also true if someone is stung and has trouble breathing or speaking, feels t... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Wounds & Bruises

Essential first aid procedures include flushing the skin or eyes with water when a person is inflicted by debris, chemicals, cuts or pollutants, explains the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CPR is an essentia... More »

www.reference.com Health Conditions & Diseases Wounds & Bruises

To relieve the discomfort of a bee sting, apply cool compresses to the affected area and take over-the-counter pain medication, advises WebMD. Be sure to remove the stinger from the wound site, if necessary. More »