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Base pairs are held together by hydrogen bonds. Depending on the nucleotides that make up the base pair, there are either two or three hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen bonds are not actually bonds, but significant attraction for... More »

www.reference.com Science Biology Molecular Biology & DNA

The base pairs in DNA are adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine. In RNA, they are adenine to uracil and guanine to cytosine. More »

www.reference.com Science Biology Molecular Biology & DNA

Protons are transferred between a conjugate acid-base pair during a chemical reaction. A conjugate pair is composed of an acid and a base that have common features. These common features result in an equal loss and gain ... More »

www.reference.com Science Biology Molecular Biology & DNA
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In the rules of DNA base pairing, cytosine always pairs with guanine, and adenine always pairs with thymine. The complementary shape between the two bases that form a pair allows for them to form hydrogen bonds. More »

www.reference.com Science Biology Molecular Biology & DNA

As shown on the NIH Genetics Home Reference site, when DNA molecules are represented as ladders, the rungs represent the base pairs of the DNA. The bases in DNA are often represented as G, A, T and C, which stand for gua... More »

www.reference.com Science Biology Molecular Biology & DNA

The complementary base pairing rule states that in DNA, adenine always pairs with thymine and guanine pairs with cytosine. This rule ensures that DNA is replicated faithfully and mutations are minimal occurrences. More »

www.reference.com Science Biology Molecular Biology & DNA

The base pairing rules for DNA are governed by the complementary base pairs: adenine (A) with thymine (T) in an A-T pairing and cytosine (C) with guanine (G) in a C-G pairing. Conversely, thymine only binds with adenine ... More »

www.reference.com Science Biology Molecular Biology & DNA