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www.reference.com/science/temperature-wood-combust-c3b660cef63c9bb7

The temperature at which wood combusts varies from 190 to 260 degrees Celsius. The ignition point of wood varies depending on the type of wood and the dryness of the wood. Decayed wood ignites at a temperature of 150 C.

www.reference.com/science/word-equation-wood-combustion-14e8887b1c58f332

The word equation for wood combustion is that wood in the presence of oxygen and high heat combusts to produce carbon dioxide, water vapor, heat and ash residue. Wood combustion gives off heat because it is an exothermic reaction.

www.reference.com/science/temperature-wood-start-burn-1f1029c19a0b7f94

When wood is completely dry and is not a type of artificial wood, the combustion temperature is generally 451 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the Argonne National Laboratory. However, there are many variables, such as moisture, oxygen ability and wood density, that com...

www.reference.com/article/complete-combustion-d7db7da1ad81d41b

A combustion reaction combines a fuel and oxidizer to produce heat and consume all the fuel. Reactions between a hydrocarbon and oxygen where the only byproducts are carbon dioxide and water are complete combustion reactions.

www.reference.com/science/examples-combustion-d873649da61ffc00

Examples of combustion, or combustion reactions, include the burning of coal and other fossil fuels, methane gas, and even sparklers and fireworks. Combustion reactions are essentially chemical reactions, and take place all around the world every day. Some reactions, su...

www.reference.com/science/temperature-wood-ignite-5b1fcab3a521fe3a

The minimum temperature needed to ignite wood is 180 degrees Celsius or 356 degrees Fahrenheit. The amount of time of exposure varies due to the type of wood. Long-leaf wood has the fastest ignition time at this temperature, taking about 14 minutes to ignite.

www.reference.com/article/combustion-reaction-bc4663e3bc45f324

A combustion reaction is an exothermic chemical reaction between a fuel source and an oxidant. The most common fuels are hydrocarbons, which are mostly made from a mixture of hydrogen and carbon atoms, while the most common oxidant is simply oxygen from air.