The rules for withdrawing money from a 403(b) tax-deferred retirement plan vary by plan, but some allow for a hardship withdrawal or loans, according to the Internal Revenue Service. Plans may also allow withdrawals when... More »

401(k) and 403(b) plans differ mainly in the type of organization sponsoring them; otherwise, they are largely the same qualified retirement plans, and the same rollover rules apply. A rollover may either be executed dir... More »

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403(b) accounts are only available for certain specialized workers, such as public school staff members and people who work for eligible tax-exempt organizations, says the IRS. Since they cannot open their own 403(b) acc... More »

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When a person younger than 59 and a half withdraws money from an individual retirement arrangement, or IRA, there may be a 10 percent tax on the distributions that are part of the person's gross income during the year of... More »

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An individual with a 403(b) retirement plan who becomes disabled can withdraw money from the account without penalty, reports the Internal Revenue Service. The distributed funds are subject to regular income tax. Most pl... More »

Employees can borrow at least $10,000 and a maximum of the lesser of half of the vested account balance or $50,000 from a 401(k) plan that allows loans, states the Internal Revenue Service. The loan must be repaid within... More »

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The 457(b) plan is a type of retirement plan that is only available to state or federal employees or employees of tax-exempt organizations, as of 2015, according to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). It works in much th... More »

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