Q:

How long do brake calipers last?

A:

Quick Answer

Brake calipers can last up to a few years if they are kept in good condition. Exactly how long they last depends on the model of car, wear and tear on the vehicle and if the car has been through natural disasters, such as floods, hurricanes and tornadoes.

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Full Answer

Calipers on a smaller vehicle used for city driving may not wear down as fast as calipers in a heavy-duty truck used for construction. Road conditions, daily travel routes, weather and terrain all influence how fast brake calipers wear out. A car that is well tended, stored in a garage and kept off dangerous roads has brake calipers that last much longer than one that is not taken care of.

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