How Does a Littleton Shotmaker Work?

How Does a Littleton Shotmaker Work?

The Littleton Shotmaker is a home-use shotgun shot casting machine that is manufactured by the Burgess Bullets Company; it uses its 110 Volt AC power connection to liquefy lead in a specially made aluminum alloy ladle. The lead is then separated into individual lead balls through a drip function and deposited into a pan of antifreeze coolant to properly harden. This process allows hunters to easily and cheaply cast their own lead shot.

As of 2015, the most recent model of the Littleton Shotmaker is the Shotmaker 65, which has an improved production capacity of 45 pounds of lead shot per hour. An earlier model, the Littleton Shotmaker 135, was discontinued in 2014. The Shotmaker 135 only allowed users to cast No. 7 1/2 shot, whereas the newer Shotmaker 65 is sold with sets of drippers in sizes ranging from No. 6 to No. 9. The Littleton Shotmaker 65 is also sold in a 220 Volt AC power model for increased production capability.

The Littleton Shotmaker only works effectively when impurities are removed from the lead in its aluminum alloy ladle before the casting process begins. Failure to remove lead impurities may lead to personal injury, blindness, severe burns or machinery malfunction.