Science

A:

As its name implies, hydrogen was first observed in water. Water consists of one oxygen atom bonded with two atoms of hydrogen. The abundance of water on Earth makes it the most common source of hydrogen on the planet. Pure hydrogen is rare on Earth, however, due to its propensity to react in the presence of oxygen and precipitate out as water vapor.

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