Q:

What is the wrist bone called?

A:

Quick Answer

The wrist bone is known as the carpus. The carpus is the term that describes the eight small bones that make up the wrist. These bones include the trapezoid, trapezium, scaphoid, capitate, hamate, pisiform, triquetrum and lunate.

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Full Answer

The wrist bone connects the fingers to the arm. The wrist connects to the bones of the arm, the radius and ulna. The top of the wrist bone is connected to five long, thin metacarpal bones. These bones connect to the finger bones. The most common injury sustained to the wrist bone is to the scaphoid bone. This bone is located near the thumb bone.

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