Q:

What are some words used to describe the moon?

A:

Quick Answer

Words that can be used to describe the moon include rocky, solid, round and bright. The moon's surface is covered in dried lava flows, dead volcanoes and impact craters.

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Full Answer

Scientists believe that the moon's crust is between 38 to 63 miles thick. On its surface, the moon contains craters, rock and soil, and not much of anything else. It makes one entire orbit around the earth every 27 days and has a thin atmosphere called an exosphere.

The moon lacks water, and its craters are known as impact basins caused by asteroid strikes. The same side of the moon is always visible from Earth.

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Related Questions

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    How long is a day on the moon?

    A:

    The moon is able to complete a full rotation every 29.5 Earth days. With an orbital rotation that is roughly the same as its rotational speed, the moon is tidally locked with the Earth, meaning that the same side is always visible.

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    What direction is the moon located in tonight?

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