Q:

What type of volcano is Mt. Hekla?

A:

Quick Answer

Mt. Hekla is a stratovolcano that has been active for centuries. It's a very famous volcano in Iceland, with a height of 1,491 meters. Mt. Hekla has had five massive fissure eruptions in the last 7,000 years; the most recent fissure eruption was 2,800 years ago.

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Full Answer

Mt. Hekla erupted five times in the 20th century; the last was in 2000. According to Fox News, the geoscientists of the University of Iceland said in March 2014 that Mt. Hekla is very close to erupting again. GPS readings indicate the presence of a higher volume of magma under the stratovolcano than there was during its last eruption in 2000.

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