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What is thick blood?

A:

Quick Answer

Thickened blood is a condition called hypercoagulation and it is caused by chemical exposure, genetic coagulation defects, virii, bacteria, mycoplasmas and/or parasites, according to Diagnose-Me.com. It occurs when fibrin is deposited in the small blood vessels.

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Full Answer

Diagnose-Me.com explains that when blood vessels get cut, the clotting process begins and the last step is fibrin formation. The clotting process involves an extremely complex series of reactions. The release of thrombin leads to the production of soluble fibrin monomer, which increases blood viscosity and leads to fibrin being deposited on the endothelial cells that line the blood vessels. A single burst of thrombin normally generates huge amounts of soluble fibrin monomer necessary for the creation of an actual clot. However, people with chronic conditions continuously generate low levels of thrombin, resulting in hypercoagulation.

Chemical exposure is one of the possible triggers of the coagulation process, states Diagnose-Me.com. Genetic coagulation defects are also known causes, and white people are more vulnerable than black people. Virii, bacteria, mycoplasmas and parasites have the ability to activate certain antibodies in the immune system, triggering the production of thrombin, which results in fibrin deposits. Thicker blood is more difficult to pump, making the heart work harder. People with thickened blood also usually have impaired muscle, nerve, bone and organ functions.

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