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What are thermometric properties?

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Quick Answer

Thermometric properties are properties of a material that vary with the temperature of it. Some examples of thermometric properties include the volume of a liquid, length of a solid, gas pressure, electrical resistance and electromotive force.

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Full Answer

With increasing temperatures, most liquids increase in volume. An example of this would be the changing of volume of a liquid in a glass thermometer. The length of a solid, such as a metal rod, increases if the temperature increases. A constant volume of gas increases in pressure as temperature increases. Electrical resistance, such as the resistance of a platinum resistor, also changes with temperature.

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