Q:

What are substances on the left side of a chemical equation called"

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Quick Answer

Substances on the left side of a chemical equation are called reactants. Substances that are found on the right side are referred to as products. In a chemical reaction, the reactants are used up and converted into products.

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A chemical reaction occurs when substances with inherent chemical properties and definite compositions react with each other to create new substances that are characteristically different from the original substances. These substances can either be in the form of an atom, which is the fundamental unit of a chemical element, or a molecule, which is the smallest unit of a chemical compound. One way of illustrating the relationship between the substances that are in involved in a chemical reaction is through a chemical equation.

All the molecular formulas of the atoms or molecules on the left portion of the equation are added to create the atoms or molecules that are also added on the right side of the equation. Chemical equations often specify the state of matter of the substances present in a chemical reaction by enclosing the symbol in parenthesis: (s) for solids, (l) for liquids, (g) for gases and (aq) for aqueous solutions. Numeral coefficients are also used to ensure that the number of atoms in the reactants is equivalent to the number of atoms in the products. Chemical reactions can be of several types, which include double-replacement reactions, neutralization reactions, redox reactions, combustion reactions, synthesis reactions or decomposition reactions.

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Related Questions

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    What is a chemical equation?

    A:

    Chemical equations are illustrations of the reactants and products in a chemical reaction. Chemical equations are expressed as A + B -> C, where A and B are the reactants, and C is the product.

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  • Q:

    What is the balanced chemical equation for cellular respiration?

    A:

    The balanced chemical equation for cellular respiration is C6H12O6 + 6O2 -> 6CO2 + 6H2O, says Biology Web. This does not include the approximate 38 adenosine triphosphates in the equation, according to the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Georgia State University. This is also known as ATP.

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    Why is it important to balance chemical equations?

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    It is important to balance chemical equations because there must be an equal number of atoms on both sides of the equation to follow the Law of the Conservation of Mass. This chemical law states that in order for the equation to be correct, "An equal quantity of matter exists both before and after the experiment; the quality and quantity of the elements remain precisely the same."

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  • Q:

    What are coefficients in chemistry?

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    Coefficients are the numbers placed before the reactants in a chemical equation so that the number of atoms in the products on the right side of the equation are equal to the number of atoms in the reactants on the left side. If a written chemical reaction were not balanced in this manner, there would be no information available regarding the relationship between the reactants and products. Also known as stoichiometric coefficients, these numerical values demonstrate that the number of atoms on either side of the equation are equal to each other.

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