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What is sodium acid pyrophosphate?

A:

Quick Answer

Sodium acid pyrosphosphate is a water-soluble chemical used in the food industry to prevent rapid changes in the acidity of a solution when other acids or bases are added. Also known as disodium pyrophosphate, it is used to enhance the ionic bonding capabilities of a molecule in a preferred direction.

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Full Answer

Sodium acid pyrosphosphate is widely used in the food industry to maintain the attractive color of canned foods, as a catalyst in chemical conversions and as a lightening agent in potatoes. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration maintains that disodium pyrophosphate does not present a health risk at present levels or foreseeable levels of use.

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