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What are the six kingdoms of life?

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Quick Answer

The six kingdoms of life are animalia, plantae, fungi, protista, archaebacteria and eubacteria. Every living organism on the planet falls into one of the six kingdoms. The placement of organisms is based on characteristics like reproduction, metabolism and cell type.

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Full Answer

The six kingdom model was first published by Cavalier Smith in 1998, and has since been revised in further publications.

Some of the organisms in the archaebacteria kingdom include psychrophiles, thermoacidophiles, halophiles and methanogens. They all have a prokaryotic cell type and require oxygen, sulfide, sulfur, carbon dioxide or hydrogen for metabolism, depending on their species. Archaebacteria reproduce asexually via fragmentation, budding or binary fission.

Organisms in the eubacteria kingdom also have a prokaryotic cell type and reproduce asexually. Depending on the species, oxygen may either be tolerated, toxic or required for metabolism.

Examples of organisms in the protista kingdom include slime molds, euglena, diatoms, brown algae and amoebae. They have a eukaryotic cell type and reproduce asexually. Some species in the kingdom reproduce via meiosis. They require oxygen for metabolism.

Fungi include organisms like molds, yeast and mushrooms. They have a eukaryotic cell type, reproduce sexually or asexually and require oxygen for metabolism.

The plantae kingdom includes all flowering plants, ferns, liverworts, gymnosperms, angiosperms and mosses. They have a eukaryotic cell type. Some species reproduce sexually, while others reproduce asexually via mitosis.

All of the organisms in the animal kingdom have a eukaryotic cell type and reproduce sexually. It is the largest kingdom with over one million known species. They require oxygen for metabolism.

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