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What are some pros and cons of plant cloning?

A:

Quick Answer

The pros of plant cloning are: it reproduces disease-resistant plants, speeds up reproduction in plants, and reproduces plants with high nutritional value. The cons of plant cloning are: it is expensive, it requires special skills, reproduces genetically identical plants, and plants reproduced through cloning have a short lifespan.

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Full Answer

Plant cloning speeds up reproduction because plants don't have to go through the gamete formation process for fertilization to occur. It also enables farmers to cultivate disease-resistant plants, which minimize the use of pesticides and herbicides and minimize economic loss in case of disease outbreaks. Plants produced through cloning are improved in terms of their quality and nutritional value. These plants are tested to maintain useful traits among them, ensuring that their nutritional value is maintained and enhanced over time.

Plant cloning is an expensive process which needs skilled manpower, modern technology, specialized equipment, and unique supplies such as rooting hormones, special growth media to facilitate tissue culture, and specific rootstocks to be used in grafting. Cloning also produces genetically identical plants, hence plant diversity is lost and, in case of disease outbreaks, all the cloned plants are likely to be affected. Plants reproduced through cloning also have a short lifespan compared to those produced through the normal fertilization process.

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