Q:

Does Pluto have craters?

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Quick Answer

Pluto, a dwarf planet, is subject to impact from cosmic material, which is the cause of planetary "craters." Pluto, however, is not close enough to Earth for modern imaging techniques to specifically identify these craters. They are assumed to exist.

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Full Answer

Given Pluto's immense distance from the Earth, it is difficult to obtain high-resolution images of its surface. While craters are presumed present, the photographs necessary to confirm their presence would have to be taken from a nearby space probe, an action not yet undertaken. Interplanetary probe New Horizons was launched in 2006 with a course track to pass by Pluto on July 14, 2015. Photos from this probe have the potential to confirm the existence and nature of craters on Pluto.

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