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Why is nitrogen important?

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Quick Answer

Nitrogen is important because it sees a significant amount of use in the agricultural sector: it is an additive in many commercial fertilizers and is sprayed on crop fields to reduce the risk of insect infestation and crop failure. Nitrogen is produced using natural gas and air, which are readily available in the environment. The availability of its raw materials makes nitrogen fertilizers and pesticides relatively easy to produce.

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Full Answer

Although nitrogen is derived from natural sources in the environment, most living organisms cannot use nitrogen in its pure form. When nitrogen is cultivated and treated, however, it becomes one of the most widespread ingredients in agricultural operations around the world.

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