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Where does mica come from?

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Quick Answer

Mica is a metamorphic mineral that comes from volcanoes and hydrothermal vents. It is easily recognized by its thin crystal layers that peel off in sheets. Mica is very shiny and is responsible for the glittery effect in composite rocks such as granite, gneiss and slate.

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Where does mica come from?
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Full Answer

Mica is composed of silicon and oxygen. Biotite, muscovite and boromuscovite are three common variations. Mica is an excellent insulator and has many electrical applications. Mica is white, yellowish, green or gray, and can be found on most continents. The largest deposits are found in India, South Dakota, Russia and Brazil. In addition to its use in electronics, mica has many artistic applications.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are some basic facts about the mineral mica?

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    Mica is a group of silicate minerals that are physically and chemically similar to one another. There are 37 known mica minerals, including biotite, lepidolite, muscovite and phlogopite. Mica minerals form in sedimentary, igneous and metamorphic rock formations in layers. Found as sheets, flakes and crystals, mica minerals are lightweight, soft, flexible, heat resistant and do not conduct electricity. These properties lead to many mica minerals being used in the electronics and electrical industries.

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  • Q:

    What is the chemical composition of mica?

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    Mica is a family of minerals primarily composed of silicon, oxygen and aluminum, with varied other metals depending on the specific mica in question. Mica molecules are based on the basic form of the silica sheet, which is a mass of silicon and oxygen arranged in flat, friable plates.

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  • Q:

    What minerals make up granite?

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    Minerals that make up granite are quartz, potassic feldspars such as orthoclase and microcline, plagioclase, and mica. Minerals that are often found in granite but aren't necessary for it to be granite are apatite, pyrite, magnetite, zircon and tourmaline. Accidental minerals found in granite are muscovite mica, garnet and pyroxine.

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  • Q:

    What are some examples of nonmetallic minerals?

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    Examples of nonmetallic minerals include sulfur, phosphorus, iodine, carbon, selenium, limestone, dolomite, gemstones, clay and mica. Nonmetallic minerals are minerals that do not contain metal. Physically, they are very volatile and have low elasticity. Chemically, they have high ionization energy.

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