Q:

Does Mars have clouds?

A:

Quick Answer

Mars indeed does have water ice clouds, similar to Earth's cirrus clouds, both high in the atmosphere and often forming as icy fog just above the ground surface. The Viking orbiter was able to capture sunrise pictures during which an icy fog was rising from within Martian craters.

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Does Mars have clouds?
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Full Answer

Mars has seasonal cycles, deserts, polar ice regions and volcanoes just like Earth as well. At any given time, Earth is anywhere from 46 to 233 million miles away from Mars. According to the Weather Channel, Mars experiences dust storms that spawn large tornadoes and temperatures as low as -200 degrees Fahrenheit coupled with heavy snowfall. Extreme weather, while possible, is not exactly typical on Mars, and the planet's atmosphere is 100 times thinner than that of Earth.

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Related Questions

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    How much gravity does Mars have?

    A:

    The force of gravity experienced on the surface of Mars is only 38 percent as strong as the Earth's surface gravity. The weaker gravitational force of Mars is due to its smaller mass and lower density.

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  • Q:

    Why is Mars red?

    A:

    Mars appears red due to the prevalence of rusted iron elements on its surface. The elements blow up into the atmosphere, intensifying the red color.

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  • Q:

    How long does it take to get to Mars?

    A:

    As of 2014, it takes approximately 150 to 300 days for a spacecraft to travel from Earth to Mars. The time depends on the launch speed, how much fuel is used and the alignment of Earth and Mars.

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  • Q:

    Who discovered Mars?

    A:

    Because Mars with its famous red coloration is readily visible from Earth, it is unknown who first discovered it; NASA lists the planet as "known by the ancients." There are records of its existence as far back as ancient Egypt.

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