Q:

How many rings does Uranus have?

A:

Quick Answer

There are thirteen rings surrounding the planet Uranus. Ten of the rings were first discovered by Australian astronomers in 1977. In 1986, technological advances allowed the space craft Voyager II to identify the other three rings encircling the planet.

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Full Answer

The rings are broken up into two distinct sets. The inner rings are dark, narrow and can be much more difficult to see. The outer set of rings are much farther from the planet, much brighter and more distinct.

In order from closest distance to farthest, the names of the rings are Zeta, 6, 5, 4, Alpha, Beta, Eta, Gamma, Delta, Lambda, Epislon, Nu and Mu.

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    What is the revolution of Uranus?

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    What is the gravity on Uranus?

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