Q:

How many neutrons does arsenic have?

A:

Quick Answer

Arsenic has 42 neutrons. This gives it an atomic weight of around 75, which is determined by adding the 42 neutrons to arsenic's 33 protons. Arsenic is a poisonous gray solid.

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Full Answer

Arsenic has been known since antiquity. Its name is derived from the Latin word arsenicum and the Greek word arsenikos. The German alchemist Albertus Magnus is thought to have been the first to isolate arsenic in 1250. Previously, arsenic compounds were mined by the ancient Greek, Egyptian and Chinese societies. Pure arsenic and its compounds are poisonous to most animals, including humans. This makes arsenic useful to the development of rat poison and several types of insecticides.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Who discovered the first element?

    A:

    Albertus Magnus discovered the first element, Arsenic, in 1250. The element had been suspected for thousands of years before it was ever purified and identified.

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  • Q:

    How much arsenic does it take to kill a human?

    A:

    The lethal dose of arsenic for human beings ranges from 100 milligrams to 300 milligrams of inorganic arsenic. The Risk Assessment Information System database estimates the acute lethal dose of inorganic arsenic at 0.6 milligrams per kilogram per day. Inorganic arsenic is 500 times more dangerous than its organic counterpart.

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  • Q:

    How many electrons does arsenic have?

    A:

    The element arsenic has an electron count of 33. The element was originally discovered by Albertus Magnus, and it is considered a semimetallic element. At a temperature of 20 degrees Celsius, arsenic stays in a solid state and has a bright, silver-gray metallic form.

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  • Q:

    Is arsenic a metal?

    A:

    Arsenic is typically classified as a metalloid element and may be found in several mineral forms in nature. It is commonly dispersed in small amounts in soil, as well as in larger amounts in gold, copper, lead and zinc ores.

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