Q:

Is magnesium water soluble or fat soluble?

A:

Quick Answer

Magnesium is a water-soluble element. The amount of a material that is dissolvable in a given amount of solvent determines solubility. One example of solubility is adding alcohol to water, while insolubility is demonstrated by adding oil to water.

Continue Reading
Is magnesium water soluble or fat soluble?
Credit: David Quigley CC-BY-2.0

Full Answer

Magnesium is a metal listed on the periodic chart. It is found in the earth's crust, as well as in combination with other minerals in nature, such as dolomite and magnesite. Magnesium also exists in the human body and in seawater. Due to its ability to burn brightly as a source of light, this element is used in flare guns, incendiary bombs and pyrotechnics.

Learn more about Atoms & Molecules

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What element has 12 protons when it is neutral?

    A:

    A neutral atom containing 12 protons is of the element magnesium. If the atom had a positive or negative charge, it would still be of the element magnesium; however, it would then be classified as an ion.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Is hydrogen gas soluble in water?

    A:

    Pure hydrogen gas, H2, is almost purely water insoluble, and like all other gases, its solubility decreases as the temperature of the water increases. At zero degrees Celsius, the solubility of hydrogen is 0.0019 grams per kilogram of water, which drops to below 0.0012 g/kg at 60 degrees.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does oxygen react with?

    A:

    Oxygen is a highly reactive and very abundant element that reacts with many things, including, as the University of California, Davis' ChemWiki points out, the reaction it has with hydrogen, which creates water. This element is so reactive that it can even react with itself.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How did hydrogen get its name?

    A:

    When French scientist Antoine Lavoisier discovered that hydrogen was a necessary component in water in 1783, he named the element "hydrogen," derived from the Greek words "hydro" and "genes." Together, these two Greek words mean "water forming."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore