Q:

How long does it take Saturn to orbit the sun?

A:

Quick Answer

Saturn orbits the sun in approximately 29.7 Earth years. It orbits the sun in an elliptical path, just as all of the planets in the solar system do.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

Because Saturn is farther away from the sun than the Earth, its distance dramatically increases the amount of time required for Saturn to make a complete revolution around the sun. The revolution that Saturn makes around the Sun is in an elliptical shaped orbit. Saturn's orbit velocity is 21,562 miles per hour, just under one-third that of Earth. However, Saturn's rotational speed is more than twice as fast as Earth's: 0.44 Earth days elapse before Saturn rotates once.

Learn more about Astronomy

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the Hubble telescope?

    A:

    The Hubble Space Telescope is a school bus-sized telescope that orbits around the Earth and takes pictures of various objects and events in space, such as stars dying and comets crashing into Jupiter. NASA launched the telescope in 1990, and it travels 343 miles above Earth's surface at a speed of 5 miles per second.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the similarities between a sun-synchronous orbit and a geostationary orbit?

    A:

    Sun-synchronous orbits keep a satellite positioned so the time remains constant across any latitude, while geostationary orbits keep a satellite in the same position night or day. Sun-synchronous and geostationary orbits keep satellites in a constant position relative to the Earth.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is unique about the surface of Saturn?

    A:

    Saturn has no surface and is a giant ball of gas that is mainly made up of helium and hydrogen, while the atmosphere of the planet also consists of the same gases. A handful of unmanned missions that have visited Saturn throughout history show that the planet has no surface to land on and is not capable of supporting living things.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What causes the Cassini division in Saturn's rings?

    A:

    The Cassini Division, a gap in the rings of Saturn, is caused by gravitational pull from Saturn’s moon Mimas. The moon’s gravity affects the tiny particles that make up the rings, creating what looks like empty space. Other divisions in Saturn’s rings are the result of similar interactions with the planet’s moons.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore