Q:

What are the limiting factors for a rain forest's biome?

A:

Quick Answer

One of the only limiting factors of a rain forest's biome is sunlight. Because the rain forest canopy is so thick, very little sunlight filters to the forest floor, limiting what can grow there.

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Full Answer

There are very few limiting factors in a rain forest because rain forests do not have harsh environmental or climatic conditions, enabling many different organisms to thrive in this biome. Because rain forests are so easy for organisms to live in, competition between these species for resources is intense. As a result, these species have very specific adaptations or niches. For instance, some species of insect live only in tree branches located 10 feet above the ground.

Sunlight is the major limiting factor. Only the hardiest plants can survive on the dimly lit forest floor. Another major limiting factor for rain forests is habitat loss or deforestation. Once humans convert forestland into homes or agricultural land, organisms that have very specific niches, specialized habitats or localized populations can decline or even disappear.

Limiting factors are factors that determine the population of a particular species in a specific biome or ecosystem. For instance, water is a major limiting factor in deserts. These factors are either biotic or abiotic. Biotic limiting factors include disease and predation. Abiotic limiting factors deal with environment and climate and include light intensity, temperature range and water availability.

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