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What are granite and gabbro?

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Quick Answer

Granite and gabbro are igneous rocks formed through the cooling and crystallization of magma in the Earth's crust. They are identified by their specific mineral content and composition.

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Granite is typically lightly-colored and has a high quartz and feldspar content, as well as smaller amounts of mica and other trace minerals. It has a coarse grain with highly visible minerals and is commonly found in the continental crust. Gabbro is a dark-colored rock formed from basaltic lava in the oceanic crust. It is composed primarily of plagioclase feldspar and may contain minerals, such as amphibole or pyroxene. The minerals found in gabbro typically form large grains during the cooling process.

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Related Questions

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    Where in the world is granite found?

    A:

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    What happens at constructive plate boundaries?

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    Constructive plate boundaries are divergent zones where the Earth forms new crust through the cooling of lava. The Internet Geography website states that most of these boundaries occur under the ocean.

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    What is an upwarped mountain?

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    How does the Earth's crust recycle itself?

    A:

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