Q:

Where does fungus come from?

A:

Quick Answer

The basic morphology of a fungi takes place in two different methods: the release of spores, and by individual cells that multiply by a process known as budding, or fission.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

A typical fungus will contain a mass of branched, tubular filaments that are enclosed in a cell wall. When a fungus has reached a certain stage in the maturity level, reproductive cells known as spores are released. Once these spores have reached a location where they can sustain life, the spores then start the process again of growing to maturity and releasing spores. The main structure of the fungus is comprised on the hyphae, or portions of the hyphae, which make up the filaments behind the cell walls.

The growth of a fungi takes place when the spore absorbs water through its cell wall, the cytoplasm contained within the fungi become active and nuclear division takes place, which causes more cytoplasm to be created. Most growth of a fungus takes place in the top region known as the apical zone. As long as the conditions remain favorable to the fungus, it will continue to grow until its location becomes disturbed and the fungus is no longer able to reproduce or remain rooted to its location.

Learn more about Biology
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    By what process do bacteria reproduce?

    A:

    Bacteria are asexual organisms that typically reproduce through a process known as binary fission. During binary fission, cells replicate and copy DNA to new cells before cell division occurs.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do fungi obtain food?

    A:

    Microbe World indicates that fungi absorb food from their immediate surroundings directly through their cell walls unlike animals, which eat food, and plants, which produce their own food through the process of photosynthesis. Kew Gardens adds that fungi function like an inside-out version of an animal's stomach. Instead of eating food and digesting it internally, fungi first dissolve food into simpler nutrients and then absorb the food after they digest it.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the colony morphology of Proteus vulgaris?

    A:

    A significant feature of the colony morphology of Proteus vulgaris is the bacterium's tendency to produce concentric rings while a colony moves across an agar plate, explains Schenectady County Community College. Colony morphology refers to the typical physical characteristics of a bacterial colony, notes Science Buddies.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is fungus?

    A:

    A fungus is a eukaryotic organism that cannot produce its own food via photosynthesis, has cell walls that contain chitin and reproduces via the use of spores, according to the University of Hawaii. Common examples of fungi include mushrooms, molds and yeasts.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore