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What are the functions of bone markings?

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Quick Answer

Bone markings are characteristics on the surface of the axial and appendicular bones that indicate attachments, articulations or openings for nerves and blood vessels, explains Boundless. Examples of attachment bone markings include fossa, ramus and condyle. Examples of openings for nerves and blood vessels include fissure, foramen and meatus.

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Full Answer

The human body contains 206 bones that are categorized as either axial or appendicular, says the National Cancer Institute. The axial skeleton consists of 80 bones, and the appendicular skeleton consists of 126 bones.

A fossa is a shallow cavity or depression in the bone, states the Paul D. Camp Community College. Fossae can be found on both the axial and appendicular skeletons. A ramus is the curved surface of a bone, and it is only found on the axial skeleton. A condyle is a smooth, rounded prominence of a bone that forms joints, and it is present on both the axial and appendicular skeletons.

A fissure is a long, crack-like hole in the bone for nerves and blood vessels, and it is found only on the axial skeleton, explains Paul D. Camp Community College. A foramen is a rounded hole in the bone where nerves, blood vessels and ligaments can pass through, and it is found on both the axial and appendicular skeletons. A meatus is a tube-like channel in a bone, and it is only found on the axial skeleton.

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