Q:

What are fault lines?

A:

Quick Answer

Fault lines are where faults in the Earth's crust intersect with the top surface of the Earth. A fault on the Earth's crust is generally a crack that makes up the boundary between the planet's various tectonic plates. Faults can be classified as either active or inactive.

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Full Answer

An active fault line is defined as areas where the Earth's crust moves over a period of time. This movement can generate earthquakes. Fault lines that are inactive show signs of previous crust movement but are relatively static in nature. Fault lines on the Earth's crust can appear as a normal dip-slip fault, a reverse dip-slip fault or a strike-slip fault.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What causes an earthquake?

    A:

    Earthquakes occur when two blocks of Earth's crust slip past each other suddenly. Tectonic plates fit together like pieces of a puzzle and are continually moving. The edges of tectonic plates are rough and sometimes stick, causing an earthquake when they break free.

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  • Q:

    How does an earthquake occur?

    A:

    Earthquakes occur due to the movement of tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Plates constantly shift and move, building energy. The release of that energy is an earthquake.

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  • Q:

    How do earthquakes form?

    A:

    Earthquakes are formed by a sudden, violent underground movement of the Earth's crust. These natural phenomena typically occur along a fault line or fault plane, which is a geological region of compressed rocks dividing crustal plates.

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  • Q:

    Where do most earthquakes happen?

    A:

    Most earthquakes happen along the boundaries of the tectonic plates that make up the Earth's crust, though earthquakes can happen anywhere on the planet. Earthquakes are also common along faults, which are deep fissures under great pressure within a plate or along multiple plates.

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