Q:

How fast does water freeze?

A:

Quick Answer

The speed at which water freezes varies greatly from one situation to the next. However, there are some primary variables from which a general estimate can be formed. The temperature of the water and its surroundings are the most important factors when determining the rate at which water freezes.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

Before water can freeze, the temperature surrounding it must reach 32 degrees Fahrenheit. This is why the environment in which the water is placed is the most important factor in determining the speed at which water freezes. Water placed in a colder environment will freeze faster than water of the same temperature in a warmer environment that is still below 32 degrees.

Learn more about States of Matter

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Why does salt water freeze slower?

    A:

    Salt water freezes slower than regular water because it has a lower freezing point. Unsalted water freezes when water molecules slow down from the removal of heat. The addition of salt creates more heat in the mixture, resulting in a lower freezing point.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Does hot water freeze faster than cold water?

    A:

    Hot water freezes faster than cold water, a phenomenon known as the Mpemba effect. The effect is named after a Tanzanian high school student who provided an interesting parable about this phenomenon in 1969.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long does water take to freeze in a freezer?

    A:

    The time it takes for water to freeze in a typical freezer varies depending on a number of factors. The first factor to consider is the amount of water being frozen.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long does it take for water to freeze?

    A:

    The time it takes for water to freeze varies from several hours to a month, depending on the volume of water, its temperature and the temperature of the surrounding air. Water freezes when it reaches 32 degrees Fahrenheit, but the time it takes for liquid particles to reach that point differs. Large lakes and deep ponds, for instance, may take several weeks to reach a freezing point and turn to solids, while a glass filled with water may freeze overnight if left outside.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore