Q:

What is an F6 Tornado?

A:

Quick Answer

An F6 tornado is a storm with winds above 318 mph. It often is referred to as an inconceivable tornado because an F6 has never been recorded as of 2014, according to About.com.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

Tornadoes are categorized by the Enhanced Fujita Scale, also known as the F-Scale. The F-Scale goes from F0 to F5, which is a storm with winds of 261 to 318 mph. Because the scale stops at F5, the Storm Prediction Center notes that no storm receives an official F6 designation, even if the winds register stronger than 318 mph. Tornadoes are rated based on calculations of wind and damage.

Learn more about Storms

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How fast does a tornado spin?

    A:

    Tornadoes are known to have circulating winds that reach between 200 and 500 miles per hour. Tornadoes typically advance across ground in a northeast direction, and at a speed no more than 30 miles per hour.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How fast do hurricanes move?

    A:

    According to the National Center for Atmospheric Research, external winds can propel hurricanes across the ocean at sustained speeds of between 10 and 20 mph. Internally, hurricanes' wind speed is considerably higher.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How quickly do winds inside a tornado move?

    A:

    The winds produced in a tornado can be less than 100 miles per hour, or they can exceed 300 miles per hour. The Enhanced Fujita Scale ranges from EF 0 to EF 5, and this scale is used to estimate the wind damage produced by a tornado.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Has anyone survived a tornado?

    A:

    There are numerous recorded instances of adults and children who have been physically lifted by a tornado and survived the experience. One case involved a young boy who was wearing a bike helmet when a 2011 tornado in Joplin, Mo. enveloped him.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore