Weather Forecasts

A:

The two main factors that determine climate are temperature and the amount of precipitation an area gets. The climate of an area is determined over a long period of time, generally more than a lifetime.

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  • What is the meaning of a red sunset?

    Q: What is the meaning of a red sunset?

    A: The sun appears red at night because the light it emits must travel a farther distance. Most of the shorter wavelengths have already scattered upon hitting particles in the air, and the only wavelengths left to view are the longer red wavelengths.
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  • What is the subpolar low polar front?

    Q: What is the subpolar low polar front?

    A: A subpolar low front is a low pressure system that is small and fleeting. Subpolar lows are typically found over the ocean, near the primary polar fronts at the poles of the northern and southern hemisphere. In the northern hemisphere, the polar front created produces low pressure cyclonic storms in Europe and the Pacific Northwest. In the Southern Hemisphere, it creates severe storms, high winds, and snowfall in Antarctica
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  • How do low-pressure systems form?

    Q: How do low-pressure systems form?

    A: According to About.com, areas of low pressure within the Earth's atmosphere are caused by unequal heating across the surface and the pressure gradient force. Incoming solar radiation largely concentrates at the equator, resulting in warmer air at the lower latitudes. This warm air has a lower barometric pressure than the cooler, denser air near the poles, and the differences between these types of air create the pressure gradient force.
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  • What causes the trade winds?

    Q: What causes the trade winds?

    A: The trade winds are caused by a combination of convection air currents and the Earth's rotation. Air is warmed near the Equator and moves towards each pole, respectively. This air is deflected by the Coriolis effect, or the spin of the Earth, causing it to fall back towards the Equator in both hemispheres.
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  • What are the two main factors that determine climate?

    Q: What are the two main factors that determine climate?

    A: The two main factors that determine climate are temperature and the amount of precipitation an area gets. The climate of an area is determined over a long period of time, generally more than a lifetime.
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  • What factors affect weather?

    Q: What factors affect weather?

    A: The amount of sunlight striking an area, the geographic location of an area, the air pressure surrounding an area and the amount of water in the atmosphere all influence the local weather. Each of these components interacts with the other components, and they may exacerbate or moderate each other.
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  • Q: How accurate are 30-day weather forecasts?

    A: Many meteorologists agree that there is little accuracy in weather forecasts that extend beyond seven days, so 30-day weather forecasts are not considered accurate. Oftentimes, a forecast extending beyond seven days is no more accurate than historical averages.
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  • Q: How do you get the 10-day forecast for Chicago?

    A: To get the 10-day weather forecast for Chicago, go to weather.com, timeanddate.com or accuweather.com. On the home page of weather.com, enter "Chicago" in the search box, and on the AccuWeather page, enter "Chicago" in the box marked Accuweather For. On timeanddate.com, scroll down to Weather, and type in "Chicago."
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  • Q: What is THW in terms of the heat index?

    A: The temperature humidity wind index, or THW, determines what the temperature actually feels like based on the heat index and wind chill combined. For example, the temperature could be 50 degrees Fahrenheit, but due to high wind chill and heat index factors, the THW determines it feels like 40 F.
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  • What is normal barometric pressure?

    Q: What is normal barometric pressure?

    A: Normal barometric pressure is typically around 101.325 kPa / 1013.25 mbar / 760 mmHg / 29/921 inHg. Pressure rarely increases or decreases more than 1 inch of mercury (3.386 kPa / 33.86 mbar / 25mmHg) above or below the 30-inch mark unless the weather conditions are extreme.
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  • Q: What weather-related words start with the letter Q?

    A: Only two official weather-related terms begin with the letter Q: quasi-stationary front and quantitative precipitation forecast. Some less technical words beginning with Q can apply to weather as well; for example, a storm can move quickly, and scientists can measure quantities of rain or snow.
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  • When is the rainy season in Playa del Carmen?

    Q: When is the rainy season in Playa del Carmen?

    A: The rainy season in Playa del Carmen lasts from June to November, with most activity occurring between August and October. However, the rain storms are usually short in duration.
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  • Q: How do you interpret a frost map?

    A: To interpret a frost map, look at the map's title to determine whether it shows the first or last frost. Find your location on the map, and identify the color that covers your location. Locate the corresponding color in the map key, and look at the date range to see when the frost happened in your area.
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  • Q: What is the purpose of weather map symbols?

    A: Weather map symbols provide a graphic representation of weather for meteorologists to read quickly. The symbols boil down complex meteorological conditions for swift reading and interpretation.
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  • Q: Where did Hurricane Rita hit?

    A: On September 24, 2005, at 2:40 a.m. Central Time, Hurricane Rita made landfall between Johnson Bayou and Sabine Pass in extreme southwestern Louisiana. Rita was a Category 3 storm when it made landfall. It caused over $12 billion in damage and over 100 fatalities.
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  • Q: What causes strong winds?

    A: Strong winds are most often caused by air moving from an area of high atmospheric pressure to an area of low pressure quickly over a small distance. This is called a strong pressure gradient force.
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  • What is a hurricane alert?

    Q: What is a hurricane alert?

    A: A hurricane alert is a public statement by meteorologists that provides information about a hurricane that is expected to occur in the near future. Hurricane alerts include both watches and warnings.
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  • Q: How do you write a weather report?

    A: A weather report should engage the reader, present the current data, give bad news followed by good news and present the forecast. While a weather report cannot change the data, it can make the weather more interesting by adding anecdotes and other details.
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  • Q: Why does weather change?

    A: Weather differs every day due to changes in heat, wind and moisture. The revolution of Earth around the sun is the primary reason for seasonal changes.
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  • Q: What are the two units of air pressure used in weather reports?

    A: The two units of air pressure used in meteorology are low pressure and high pressure. These two units of barometric pressure have a large influence with the weather on Earth.
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  • What are some resources for long-range weather forecasts?

    Q: What are some resources for long-range weather forecasts?

    A: Some resources for long-range weather forecasts include the Farmer's Almanac, the Weather Underground and the National Weather Service. These services also include past weather data as well as discussions of past and ongoing climate change.
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