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A subpolar low front is a low pressure system that is small and fleeting. Subpolar lows are typically found over the ocean, near the primary polar fronts at the poles of the northern and southern hemisphere. In the northern hemisphere, the polar front created produces low pressure cyclonic storms in Europe and the Pacific Northwest. In the Southern Hemisphere, it creates severe storms, high winds, and snowfall in Antarctica

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  • What factors affect weather?

    Q: What factors affect weather?

    A: The amount of sunlight striking an area, the geographic location of an area, the air pressure surrounding an area and the amount of water in the atmosphere all influence the local weather. Each of these components interacts with the other components, and they may exacerbate or moderate each other.
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  • How do low-pressure systems form?

    Q: How do low-pressure systems form?

    A: According to About.com, areas of low pressure within the Earth's atmosphere are caused by unequal heating across the surface and the pressure gradient force. Incoming solar radiation largely concentrates at the equator, resulting in warmer air at the lower latitudes. This warm air has a lower barometric pressure than the cooler, denser air near the poles, and the differences between these types of air create the pressure gradient force.
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  • What causes the trade winds?

    Q: What causes the trade winds?

    A: The trade winds are caused by a combination of convection air currents and the Earth's rotation. Air is warmed near the Equator and moves towards each pole, respectively. This air is deflected by the Coriolis effect, or the spin of the Earth, causing it to fall back towards the Equator in both hemispheres.
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  • What is the meaning of a red sunset?

    Q: What is the meaning of a red sunset?

    A: The sun appears red at night because the light it emits must travel a farther distance. Most of the shorter wavelengths have already scattered upon hitting particles in the air, and the only wavelengths left to view are the longer red wavelengths.
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  • What is the subpolar low polar front?

    Q: What is the subpolar low polar front?

    A: A subpolar low front is a low pressure system that is small and fleeting. Subpolar lows are typically found over the ocean, near the primary polar fronts at the poles of the northern and southern hemisphere. In the northern hemisphere, the polar front created produces low pressure cyclonic storms in Europe and the Pacific Northwest. In the Southern Hemisphere, it creates severe storms, high winds, and snowfall in Antarctica
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  • What are the two main factors that determine climate?

    Q: What are the two main factors that determine climate?

    A: The two main factors that determine climate are temperature and the amount of precipitation an area gets. The climate of an area is determined over a long period of time, generally more than a lifetime.
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  • Q: How is wind chill temperature calculated?

    A: Scientists calculate wind chill by a mathematical formula that considers air temperature and wind speed. The National Weather Service and the Canadian Weather Service use one of the most common formulas for wind chill: Wind Chill = 35.74 + 0.6215T – 35.75(V^0.16) + 0.4275T(V^0.16). In this formula, T is the current air temperature in degrees Fahrenheit, and V represents the wind speed in miles per hour.
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  • Q: What is the temperate climate zone?

    A: The temperate climate zone is located between the Tropic of Cancer and the Arctic Circle in the Northern Hemisphere and between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Antarctic Circle in the Southern Hemisphere. Areas with a temperate climate generally have warm summers, cold winters and moderate springs and summers. They do not have extremes in temperature or precipitation.
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  • What does a falling barometer indicate?

    Q: What does a falling barometer indicate?

    A: A falling barometer reading usually indicates that a storm or wet weather is approaching. A more rapid change indicates the weather will change sooner. A barometer reading that remains steady indicates that no immediate change in weather should be expected.
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  • Q: How do you determine temperatures with wind chill factors?

    A: Determine temperatures according to the wind chill factor by using a wind chill chart, such as the one provided by the National Weather Service. Since there is no universally agreed standard for the definition of wind chill, many different formulas exist to calculate the temperature according to the wind chill factor.
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  • Q: When does it snow in Gatlinburg?

    A: Although it is impossible to tell exactly when it will snow in Gatlinburg, Tenn., it is most likely to occur between the months of December and April. Snows in November are also likely.
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  • Q: What is a dew point?

    A: A dew point is the temperature at which water begins to accumulate in the form of dew drops on objects in the environment. If the dew point is 70 degrees Fahrenheit, then dew forms when the temperature reaches 70 degrees Fahrenheit.
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  • Q: How do you explain the relationship between fronts and low pressure systems?

    A: A front is a boundary between air masses that leads to a low pressure system as the atmosphere attempts to even out the temperature contrast. If there is enough moisture in the air, the uplift as these two air masses collide causes rain. If the temperature differential is large enough, the collision leads to thunderstorms, according to NOAA.
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  • Q: What is the weather like in Mexico?

    A: Coastal Mexico has a warm, sunny climate with seasonal monsoon rains, while inland, mountainous regions experience a semi-tropical or temperate climate. Temperature and rainfall in Mexico often vary significantly from region to region.
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  • Q: How do you interpret a frost map?

    A: To interpret a frost map, look at the map's title to determine whether it shows the first or last frost. Find your location on the map, and identify the color that covers your location. Locate the corresponding color in the map key, and look at the date range to see when the frost happened in your area.
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  • Q: Does the National Weather Service provide rain totals by ZIP code?

    A: The National Weather Service, in conjunction with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, provides a historical precipitation report that is categorized by ZIP code. This database does not list rainfall totals for each ZIP code individually, but it offers a search option instead.
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  • Q: What is the maritime tropical air mass?

    A: The maritime tropical air mass is the warm humidity often felt in the air in the southeastern part of the United States. It is the result of the combination of direct sunshine, the Gulf Stream and the Gulf of Mexico.
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  • Q: How do you get real-time California earthquake updates?

    A: View real-time updates about California earthquakes at the California Real Time Earthquake Update site or at the Live Quakes Map section of the Global Incident Map. Both sites get their updates from the U.S. government.
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  • Q: Where can you find the NOAA winter forecast?

    A: The NOAA winter forecast is available on their website at NOAA.gov. On the site, you can find the complete nontechnical forecast within the current U.S. Winter Outlook.
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  • Q: When are upper air winds fastest?

    A: The upper air winds are the fastest in the wintertime when the core wind speeds of the polar front can reach speeds of approximately 250 miles per hour. The polar jet stream travels around the earth at a height of about 5 to 8 miles above the surface.
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  • Q: What do you call a scientist who studies weather?

    A: A scientist who studies weather is called a meteorologist. A meteorologist researches the atmosphere, forecasts weather and studies the effect climate has on the planet and its people.
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