Volcanoes

A:

The main features of a volcano include a vent, a summit crater and a magma chamber. The vent is an opening through which volcanic material is erupted. Volcanoes can have more than one vent. The summit crater is the large concave opening that holds the central vent at the top of the volcano. The magma chamber is the large pool-like structure inside the volcano that holds the magma.

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  • What is the oldest volcano in the world?

    Q: What is the oldest volcano in the world?

    A: Mt. Etna is considered the oldest volcano in the world. Its first recorded eruption took place around 1500 B.C.E. Since that date, the volcano is believed to have erupted an additional 190 times.
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  • What are the names of some dormant volcanoes?

    Q: What are the names of some dormant volcanoes?

    A: Mount Fuji and Mount Ranier are both names of dormant volcanoes. Dormant volcanoes are those that have not recently erupted but are still expected to at some point in time.
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  • What conditions make for a violent volcanic eruption?

    Q: What conditions make for a violent volcanic eruption?

    A: According to the Oregon State University Department of Geosciences, a volcanic eruption may become violent if pressure builds up inside the volcano for any reason. An explosive eruption is much more dangerous than a steady flow of magma and can spread ash and pyroclastic material over a wide area. The eruption of Mount Saint Helens in 1980 was a textbook example of a violent, explosive volcanic eruption.
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  • What is a mudflow on a volcano called?

    Q: What is a mudflow on a volcano called?

    A: Mudflow on a volcano is called lahar and is typically caused by heavy rains during or after volcanic eruptions. Lahars can also occur when nearby ice or snow melts, carrying ash and rock debris down a volcano's slopes.
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  • How do volcanoes change the Earth's surface?

    Q: How do volcanoes change the Earth's surface?

    A: Volcanic eruptions involve the incursion of liquid magma into a physical environment, and the effects include major transformations, ranging from the formation of new land to the destruction of the viability of an existing environment. Just one example of the creation of new land comes from the Hawaiian Islands, which appeared as magma cooled into land after eruptions.
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  • What do volcanologists do?

    Q: What do volcanologists do?

    A: Volcanologists study the processes of volcano formation and their eruptive activity. In addition to studying current volcanic activity, they also study the eruptions of volcanoes throughout history.
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  • What is a magma chamber?

    Q: What is a magma chamber?

    A: A magma chamber is a structure made up of solidified crystal mush and molten rock located below the surface of the Earth. When a magma chamber solidifies and cools, it is known as a pluton.
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  • What are active and inactive volcanoes?

    Q: What are active and inactive volcanoes?

    A: Active volcanoes are those that have erupted recently or regularly erupt, and inactive volcanoes are those that have not erupted for a long time. The exact time distinction between active and inactive volcanoes differs between experts.
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  • How many super volcanoes are there in the world?

    Q: How many super volcanoes are there in the world?

    A: The Earth has approximately 20 known supervolcanoes, according to James Morgan, who write for the BBC News. What constitutes a "supervolcano" is not clearly defined, so the term is avoided in the literature, but it is often used in reference to two distinct phenomena.
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  • What is an ash cloud?

    Q: What is an ash cloud?

    A: An ash cloud is a large cloud of smoke and debris that forms over a volcano after it erupts. Ash clouds consist of several elements, including ash, gases, dust, steam, rock fragments and other materials that come from inside the volcano and combine in the air above the crater.
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  • What is an active volcano?

    Q: What is an active volcano?

    A: An active volcano is one that has had at least one eruption in the past 10,000 years. An active volcano can be dormant or erupting.
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  • When will Yellowstone erupt?

    Q: When will Yellowstone erupt?

    A: Predicting when the next eruption will occur is difficult; however, the National Science Foundation estimates the next major eruption shouldn't happen for at least another one million years. The next eruption may dump several inches of ash over a large portion of the United States and could change Earth's climate.
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  • What is the Pacific Ring of Fire?

    Q: What is the Pacific Ring of Fire?

    A: The Pacific Ring of Fire is the name for a horseshoe-shaped region of high seismic and volcanic activity surrounding the Pacific Ocean Basin. In addition to volcanoes, the area encompasses major fault zones. It spans 25,000 miles and touches a number of island chains, as well as four continents.
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  • What is an extinct volcano?

    Q: What is an extinct volcano?

    A: An extinct volcano is one that has not erupted in at least 10,000 years and is not expected to erupt in the future, according to Oregon State University. There can be confusion between dormant and extinct volcanoes, but the difference between the two is that a dormant volcano may erupt even if it is in the distant future.
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  • What is a composite cone volcano?

    Q: What is a composite cone volcano?

    A: A composite cone volcano, or a stratovolcano, is built by multiple eruptions from surrounding volcanoes. They are formed over hundreds of thousands of years and have their entire structure build by magma flowing from geographically close volcanoes.
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  • What are the main features of a volcano?

    Q: What are the main features of a volcano?

    A: The main features of a volcano include a vent, a summit crater and a magma chamber. The vent is an opening through which volcanic material is erupted. Volcanoes can have more than one vent. The summit crater is the large concave opening that holds the central vent at the top of the volcano. The magma chamber is the large pool-like structure inside the volcano that holds the magma.
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  • What is a lateral blast?

    Q: What is a lateral blast?

    A: A lateral blast, also known as a lateral eruption, is a volcanic eruption that occurs out of the side of a volcano instead of at its summit. An example of a lateral blast is the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens.
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  • How often does Old Faithful erupt?

    Q: How often does Old Faithful erupt?

    A: Old Faithful erupts at varying intervals from 60 to 110 minutes in length. The Yellowstone National Park staff offers predictions based on past activity; this is so that visitors can plan a visit to the geyser area during an eruption, which lasts between one-and-a-half minutes and five minutes.
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  • How do volcanoes affect the environment?

    Q: How do volcanoes affect the environment?

    A: An erupting volcano emits gases and dust particles that can cause profound changes in weather and climate throughout the world. Volcanism also affects the environment by producing acid rain and making ocean water warmer.
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  • What is the top of a volcano called?

    Q: What is the top of a volcano called?

    A: The top of a volcano is called the crater. A volcano is shaped like an inverted cone, and the tip of the cone is the crater. The crater is the opening of the vent in a volcano through which the molten magma or the lava is ejected.
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  • When did Mount Saint Helens erupt?

    Q: When did Mount Saint Helens erupt?

    A: Mount St. Helens' most significant eruption in modern times occurred on March 20, 1980. It was followed by additional eruptions between Dec. 7, 1989 to Jan. 6, 1990, Nov. 5, 1990 to Feb. 14, 1991, Oct.11, 2004, Mar. 8, 2005, and between Jan. 16, 2008 to July 10, 2008.
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