Volcanoes

A:

The main vent of a volcano is the outlet chamber in the Earth's crust that allows hot magma to reach the surface. While secondary vents may form to alleviate the pressure caused by a magma chamber, the main vent is responsible for giving volcanoes their familiar cone shape.

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  • How many super volcanoes are there in the world?

    Q: How many super volcanoes are there in the world?

    A: The Earth has approximately 20 known supervolcanoes, according to James Morgan, who write for the BBC News. What constitutes a "supervolcano" is not clearly defined, so the term is avoided in the literature, but it is often used in reference to two distinct phenomena.
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  • What are the positive and negative effects of volcanoes?

    Q: What are the positive and negative effects of volcanoes?

    A: The negative effects of volcanoes include the destruction of man-made and natural environments and the death of human, animal and plant life. On the other hand, volcanoes generate geothermal energy and produce nutrients that result in fertile soil.
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  • Where is Krakatoa located?

    Q: Where is Krakatoa located?

    A: Krakatoa is a volcanic island located in the Sunda Strait between Java and Sumatra in Indonesia. The island measures 3 miles wide by 5 1/2 miles long.
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  • How often does Old Faithful erupt?

    Q: How often does Old Faithful erupt?

    A: Old Faithful erupts at varying intervals from 60 to 110 minutes in length. The Yellowstone National Park staff offers predictions based on past activity; this is so that visitors can plan a visit to the geyser area during an eruption, which lasts between one-and-a-half minutes and five minutes.
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  • Are volcanoes mountains?

    Q: Are volcanoes mountains?

    A: While many volcanoes are mountains, it is possible for a volcano to erupt from a vent in any type of land form. Over time, volcanoes become mountains by depositing their discharge around them in ever-increasing layers. Not all mountains are volcanoes.
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  • How do volcanoes change the Earth's surface?

    Q: How do volcanoes change the Earth's surface?

    A: Volcanic eruptions involve the incursion of liquid magma into a physical environment, and the effects include major transformations, ranging from the formation of new land to the destruction of the viability of an existing environment. Just one example of the creation of new land comes from the Hawaiian Islands, which appeared as magma cooled into land after eruptions.
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  • What are the names of some dormant volcanoes?

    Q: What are the names of some dormant volcanoes?

    A: Mount Fuji and Mount Ranier are both names of dormant volcanoes. Dormant volcanoes are those that have not recently erupted but are still expected to at some point in time.
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  • What happened when Mount Etna erupted?

    Q: What happened when Mount Etna erupted?

    A: Noxious fumes and tremendous amounts of ash and molten lava spewed from Mount Etna in 1669 and killed more than 20,000 Sicilians. Just prior to this eruption, an associated earthquake killed an additional 15,000 people.
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  • What is a lateral blast?

    Q: What is a lateral blast?

    A: A lateral blast, also known as a lateral eruption, is a volcanic eruption that occurs out of the side of a volcano instead of at its summit. An example of a lateral blast is the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens.
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  • What is the Pacific Ring of Fire?

    Q: What is the Pacific Ring of Fire?

    A: The Pacific Ring of Fire is the name for a horseshoe-shaped region of high seismic and volcanic activity surrounding the Pacific Ocean Basin. In addition to volcanoes, the area encompasses major fault zones. It spans 25,000 miles and touches a number of island chains, as well as four continents.
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  • What are active and inactive volcanoes?

    Q: What are active and inactive volcanoes?

    A: Active volcanoes are those that have erupted recently or regularly erupt, and inactive volcanoes are those that have not erupted for a long time. The exact time distinction between active and inactive volcanoes differs between experts.
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  • What country has the most volcanoes?

    Q: What country has the most volcanoes?

    A: Indonesia has the most volcanoes, with 76 volcanoes that have erupted within historical times. The Smithsonian Institution has 141 Indonesian entries in its volcano database; this includes volcanoes which have yet to erupt.
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  • What is a mudflow on a volcano called?

    Q: What is a mudflow on a volcano called?

    A: Mudflow on a volcano is called lahar and is typically caused by heavy rains during or after volcanic eruptions. Lahars can also occur when nearby ice or snow melts, carrying ash and rock debris down a volcano's slopes.
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  • What is an extinct volcano?

    Q: What is an extinct volcano?

    A: An extinct volcano is one that has not erupted in at least 10,000 years and is not expected to erupt in the future, according to Oregon State University. There can be confusion between dormant and extinct volcanoes, but the difference between the two is that a dormant volcano may erupt even if it is in the distant future.
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  • When did Mount Rainier last erupt?

    Q: When did Mount Rainier last erupt?

    A: Washington state's Mount Rainier last erupted between 1894 and 1895, according to Geology.com. Residents of nearby cities heard explosions coming from the volcano's summit. The last magmatic eruption the volcano experienced was over 1,000 years ago. Geologists believe that Mt. Rainier is due to erupt again in the near future.
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  • What is a main vent in a volcano?

    Q: What is a main vent in a volcano?

    A: The main vent of a volcano is the outlet chamber in the Earth's crust that allows hot magma to reach the surface. While secondary vents may form to alleviate the pressure caused by a magma chamber, the main vent is responsible for giving volcanoes their familiar cone shape.
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  • What is the closest volcano to Denver, Colorado?

    Q: What is the closest volcano to Denver, Colorado?

    A: There are no active volcanoes near Denver, Colorado. Nearby extinct volcanoes are located 2 hours from Denver in the Central Colorado volcanic field. These include the Grizzly Peak and Mount Aetna cauldrons and Bonanza and Marshall Creek calderas. The Central Colorado Volcanic Field is located in Park and Teller counties.
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  • Where is Mount Kilimanjaro located?

    Q: Where is Mount Kilimanjaro located?

    A: Mount Kilimanjaro is located in Tanzania. It is a dormant volcano comprising three volcanic cones, and is the highest peak in Africa.
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  • What are the different parts of a volcano?

    Q: What are the different parts of a volcano?

    A: The main parts of a volcano include the summit crater, the magma chamber, the central vent and the edifice. While volcanoes vary considerably in terms of size and shape, most land volcanoes have structural similarities.
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  • What gases are produced by volcanic eruptions?

    Q: What gases are produced by volcanic eruptions?

    A: Volcanic eruptions mainly produce steam (H2 0 ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). They do release other gases in lesser amounts, such as carbon monoxide (CO), helium (He), hydrogen (H 2 ), hydrogen chloride (HCL), hydrogen fluoride (HF) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S).
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  • When will Yellowstone erupt?

    Q: When will Yellowstone erupt?

    A: Predicting when the next eruption will occur is difficult; however, the National Science Foundation estimates the next major eruption shouldn't happen for at least another one million years. The next eruption may dump several inches of ash over a large portion of the United States and could change Earth's climate.
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