Soil

A:

According to Colorado State University Extension, soil texture is defined by the size of the particles that make up the soil. Soil texture typically is categorized into three types: sand, silt and clayey.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • Where is clay found?

    Q: Where is clay found?

    A: Clay is one of the most common minerals and is mainly found on or near the surface of the Earth. Nearly all civilizations have used it to make pots, bricks and tablets.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a frost line?

    Q: What is a frost line?

    A: The frost line is the maximum depth at which soil is frozen, or the lower limit of permafrost. The depth of the frost depends on the local climate, the heat transfer properties of the soil, and the adjacent materials and nearby heat sources.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What's the difference between sand and dirt?

    Q: What's the difference between sand and dirt?

    A: The main difference between sand and dirt is that dirt contains clay. Clay contains thousands of electrically charged particles that stick together thanks to water. Sand has been washed of clay. The remaining items in dirt are grains of sand ranging from 64 microns to 2 millimeters in diameter.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the components of soil?

    Q: What are the components of soil?

    A: Soil contains four essential components: rock particles, water, air and leaves. Although soil and dirt do not move or express feelings and emotions, they are actually very much alive, contain living and nonliving materials and serve important functions in ecosystems around the world.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why does too much fertilizer kill a plant?

    Q: Why does too much fertilizer kill a plant?

    A: Typically, too much of any commercial fertilizer kills plants because they are salt based products. The imbalance of the natural chemicals within the plant leads to it wilting or dying if the situation is not repaired.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Is quicksand real?

    Q: Is quicksand real?

    A: Quicksand is real, but contrary to certain myths, quicksand is not prevalent in deserts. Quicksand can be found in damp areas such as lakes and beaches. The difference between quicksand and regular sand is the amount of water surrounding the sand particles.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What kind of soil is in the desert?

    Q: What kind of soil is in the desert?

    A: Depending upon the type of desert, soils range from coarse and rocky to fine and salty. Typically, deserts are divided into four categories: arid, semiarid, coastal and cold.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What causes soil erosion?

    Q: What causes soil erosion?

    A: Wind, water, ice and waves carry off soil particles and cause soil erosion. Although this is a natural process, human activities that disturb the surface of the earth increase the rate of soil erosion. Activities such as mining, construction, deforestation and intensive agriculture leave the topsoil exposed and vulnerable to the agents of erosion.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why is soil important to plants?

    Q: Why is soil important to plants?

    A: Soil is important to plants because it stores nutrients and serves as a medium for growth. It is an anchor for roots and also holds water needed by plants for moisture. Soil contains the air, water and food that provides a suitable place for plants to grow.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is coal made out of?

    Q: What is coal made out of?

    A: Coal is made out of residue of trees and plants from millions of years ago through combined effects of pressure and heat. It is a sedimentary, organic and combustible rock composed mainly of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Where is iron found in nature?

    Q: Where is iron found in nature?

    A: Iron is found throughout the earth, comprising about 32 percent of the earth's crust and up to 80 percent of the Earth's core. It is the second most abundant metal on earth.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the density of sand?

    Q: What is the density of sand?

    A: The density of loose sand is 90 pounds per cubic foot. The density of sand depends on how wet it is; completely dry sand is 80 pounds per cubic foot, damp sand is 100 pounds per cubic foot, wet sand is 120 pounds per cubic foot, and wet packed sand is 130 pounds per cubic foot.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How much dirt does a person consume in a lifetime?

    Q: How much dirt does a person consume in a lifetime?

    A: One person consumes several pounds of dirt in a lifetime, depending on how long the person lives. Dirt is on fresh fruits and vegetables, no matter how thoroughly they are washed.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is mature soil?

    Q: What is mature soil?

    A: Mature soil has gone through the natural soil formation process. It has clearly developed genetic horizons and become stabilized to be in equilibrium with its environment.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are solutions to soil degradation?

    Q: What are solutions to soil degradation?

    A: Soil erosion, or degradation, is prevented using erosion control methods. The types of control methods used vary depending on several factors, such as the depth and severity of soil erosion that has occurred on a property. In addition to preventing further degradation, minimizing soil erosion keeps soil and dirt strong, which in turn maximizes plant, crop and flower growth.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Where is gypsum found?

    Q: Where is gypsum found?

    A: Gypsum is found in sedimentary rock formations across the world in over 85 countries and mined in 17 states. Gypsum is also known as calcium sulfate dihydrate.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are soil horizons?

    Q: What are soil horizons?

    A: Soil horizons are horizontal layers of soil. Each layer has a distinct name that is distinguished by a particular letter. The contents of each layer vary.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is sandy soil?

    Q: What is sandy soil?

    A: Sandy soils are granular soils that contain small rock and mineral particles. The texture of sandy soils is usually gritty. This soil feels course whether it is dry or wet.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Q: Why are soil boring tests conducted?

    A: A soil boring test are conducted for different reasons, including to determine good drilling locations and depths for wells and basements. The soil boring tests are performed by excavating soil from an area.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Q: How does an ecosystem work?

    A: An ecosystem works through the interaction of living and nonliving organisms. Plants, animals, soil, water, heat, light, air, water and water temperature all work together to create a balanced system. A healthy ecosystem has plenty of species diversity, with each species having a niche in the ecosystem that keeps the system healthy.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Q: What is loess soil?

    A: Loess soil is a windblown sediment comprised typically of dust and silt. Though wind is responsible for most loess soil, glaciers also contribute to the Earth's supply by grinding rocks into powder form, which is then transported by streams.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: