Rain

A:

Rain is the result of water droplets gathering together in clouds and gravity causing the water droplets to fall as rain. Warm air has more water droplets than cold air.

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  • What Is Convectional Rainfall?

    Q: What Is Convectional Rainfall?

    A: Convectional rainfall occurs when the warm air deflected from a landform rises and forms rain clouds. Convectional rainfall is very common in tropical areas as well as areas in southeastern England.
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  • What Causes the Smell After Rain?

    Q: What Causes the Smell After Rain?

    A: The smell of rain is unmistakable, and there are many factors that make up its sweet, earthy scent. It comes mostly from rainwater falling on dried materials, bacteria, or algae on the ground. There is also evidence that some people can smell the rain not only after it’s gone but before it comes.
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  • What Is the Average Yearly Rainfall in a Rain Forest?

    Q: What Is the Average Yearly Rainfall in a Rain Forest?

    A: In a typical year, a tropical rain forest gets an average of 50 to 260 inches of rain. This helps the climate stay very hot and humid.
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  • What Is the Rainiest City in the USA?

    Q: What Is the Rainiest City in the USA?

    A: The rainiest city in the United States is Mobile, Alabama, according to a 2007 article on LiveScience. The city averages 67 inches of rain annually and experiences approximately 59 rainy days per year.
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  • Where Does Rain Come From?

    Q: Where Does Rain Come From?

    A: Rain and other forms of precipitation fall from the clouds. When warm air passes over a body of water, it causes the water to evaporate. Once the water rises high enough, it clumps with other water vapor and becomes a cloud. The air cannot hold an infinite quantity of water, so when the amount of water present in the cloud exceeds the air’s ability to hold it, the water falls in droplets as rain.
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  • What Is the Average Rainfall in the Amazon Rainforest?

    Q: What Is the Average Rainfall in the Amazon Rainforest?

    A: The average rainfall in the Amazon rainforest is about 108 inches per year. The high amount of rain combined with a warm year-round climate makes the Amazon rainforest the most biodiverse place on Earth.
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  • What Are Some Examples of Condensation?

    Q: What Are Some Examples of Condensation?

    A: Some examples of condensation include the water that gathers on a bathroom mirror after a hot shower and the water that collects on grass as dew. Condensation is the process where gas molecules slow down and come together to form a liquid.
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  • Where Does It Rain the Most in the United States?

    Q: Where Does It Rain the Most in the United States?

    A: According to the Weather Channel, Mount Waialeale on the Hawaiian island of Kauai receives about 450 inches of annual rainfall, making it the rainiest part of the country and one of the rainiest in the world. In the Hawaiian language, the name literally means "rippling water."
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  • What Causes Rain?

    Q: What Causes Rain?

    A: Any time the droplets in clouds grow and come together to form drops that are large enough to create a speed of falling that is greater than the speed at which the cloud is blowing upward, then they head downward, and if they make it down without evaporating, people on the ground experience them as rain or snow. Sometimes rain evaporates again and heads back up into the clouds. The greater the amount of water vapor under the cloud and the stronger the winds on the updraft, the more likely precipitation becomes.
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  • Why Is the Water Cycle Important to Life on Earth?

    Q: Why Is the Water Cycle Important to Life on Earth?

    A: The water cycle is responsible for distributing water across the earth through evaporation, condensation and precipitation, a process that is vital for sustaining life on earth by providing water to plants, animals and humans. It is also the driving force behind the earth's climate. Clouds are formed through condensation, and temperature is regulated through evaporation and water vapor in the air.
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  • How Do Droughts Form?

    Q: How Do Droughts Form?

    A: Put simply, droughts are caused by a prolonged depletion of precipitation in a certain ecosystem or climate over a long period of time. Unlike normal dry spells, droughts are so severe that they can thoroughly dry out vast expanses of land, like deserts. Droughts can be extraordinarily damaging and expensive to the people who live in the environments where they occur, especially in terms of the agricultural industry.
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  • What Is Rainfall?

    Q: What Is Rainfall?

    A: Rainfall is the result of water vapor condensing and precipitating, forming droplets that fall from clouds due to gravity. It is an important part of the water cycle.
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  • How Is Rain Formed?

    Q: How Is Rain Formed?

    A: Rain is the result of water droplets gathering together in clouds and gravity causing the water droplets to fall as rain. Warm air has more water droplets than cold air.
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  • How Does Elevation Affect Precipitation?

    Q: How Does Elevation Affect Precipitation?

    A: Areas of high elevation, such as mountain ranges, often drain the air of its moisture. As the air rises up the mountain, it cools. As the air cools, it loses its ability to hold water. The water then condenses out of the air and falls as precipitation.
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  • What Causes Rain to Fall?

    Q: What Causes Rain to Fall?

    A: Rain falls when atmospheric water vapor falls under gravity. In other words, when the water vapor in the atmosphere becomes too heavy, rain falls.
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  • Q: What Is the Scientific Name for a Rainbow?

    A: Natural phenomena, such as a rainbow, have no scientific names. However, the mnemonic "Roy G. Biv" is often used to easily remember the colors of a rainbow.
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  • Q: What Is the Difference Between Sleet and Hail?

    A: Sleet is smaller and occurs during the winter, whereas hail is larger and happens during warmer months, according to AccuWeather. Both sleet and hail are frozen precipitation, but the two major differences revolve around size and timing. Hail is larger because strong updrafts in thunderstorms keep hail aloft longer. Sleet occurs when snow melts in the cloud and then freezes again in a lower layer to create small pellets.
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  • Q: How Do You Save Water?

    A: There are many ways to save water, both inside and outside of the home. Some examples include turning off the faucet while brushing one's teeth and installing a water-conserving toilet. Active measures taken to reduce water consumption can be grouped into three categories: personal, professional and social.
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  • Q: Where Is Acid Rain Found?

    A: According to the Department of Oceanography at Texas A&M University, acid rain falls primarily near power plants. The Northeastern United States is the most affected area. Little Echo Pond in Franklin, N.Y. is one of the most acidic lakes in the United States with a pH of 4.2.
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  • Q: What Causes Fog to Form?

    A: Fog forms when water droplets condense to form fog close to the ground. The water droplets are formed when water vapor bonds with condensation nuclei. Water evaporation can occur from bodies of water, wind, precipitation and atmospheric heating.
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  • What Is Orographic Rainfall?

    Q: What Is Orographic Rainfall?

    A: Orographic rainfall is rain that is produced from the lifting of moist air over a mountain. The moist air rises and cools, producing orographic clouds, which are the source of the rain. Most orographic rain falls upwind of the mountain range, with some also falling a short distance downwind. This process can produce any type of precipitation, including snow, sleet, hail or freezing drizzle.
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