Planets

A:

The Earth completes a rotation around the sun, known as an orbit, in 365.24 days. Earth is located an average of 92.96 million miles from the sun, varying between the closest distance of 91.40 million miles and the furthest distance of 94.51 million miles.

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  • How Would a Human Being Fare on Mars?

    Q: How Would a Human Being Fare on Mars?

    A: Low pressures, a lack of oxygen and cold weather on Mars would force humans to remain confined to spacecrafts and vehicles, according to physics.org. Astronauts could occasionally walk around in the open, but only if they wore spacesuits. Settlers would risk dying if their spacesuits became seriously damage. Underground shelter would be an ideal scenario. As of 2014, no settlement on Mars has been established.
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  • Why Is Pluto Not a Planet?

    Q: Why Is Pluto Not a Planet?

    A: In 2006, the International Astronomical Union changed Pluto's classification from a planet to a dwarf planet because the planet has not cleared its orbit of other objects. When a planet clears its orbit, all other objects on the orbital path are either drawn into the planet's gravitational pull or flung away from it and out of the orbit.
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  • Can Venus Be Seen From Earth?

    Q: Can Venus Be Seen From Earth?

    A: For most of the year, Venus is visible to the naked eye. The exception to this is when Venus is too close to the sun to be observed.
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  • Who Discovered Mars?

    Q: Who Discovered Mars?

    A: Because Mars with its famous red coloration is readily visible from Earth, it is unknown who first discovered it; NASA lists the planet as "known by the ancients." There are records of its existence as far back as ancient Egypt.
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  • What Is the Fastest Moving Planet in the Solar System?

    Q: What Is the Fastest Moving Planet in the Solar System?

    A: The fastest-moving planet in the solar system is Mercury. The planet whizzes around the sun at an orbital velocity of 1.6 times that of Earth's orbital velocity. This amounts to 107,700 miles per hour.
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  • What Are the Characteristics of the Outer Planets?

    Q: What Are the Characteristics of the Outer Planets?

    A: According to Universe Today, the four outer planets of the solar system are all gas giants. This means they lack a conventional surface, and are made up of dense gases around a possible rocky or metallic core. These planets are called Jovian planets to distinguish them from the four rocky terrestrial planets closer to the sun.
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  • How Much Would a 100-Pound Person Weigh on Saturn?

    Q: How Much Would a 100-Pound Person Weigh on Saturn?

    A: A person weighing 100 pounds on Earth would weigh 107 pounds near the poles of Saturn and 91 pounds near Saturn's equator. This difference is due to centrifugal force offsetting some of the pull of gravity along the equator as the planet spins on its axis.
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  • What Planets Can You See Without a Telescope?

    Q: What Planets Can You See Without a Telescope?

    A: The planets Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn can be seen without the help of a telescope, and, in the right conditions, it may also be possible to see Uranus without a telescope. It requires good eyesight, little light pollution and the knowledge of exactly where Uranus is in the night sky to see it, making it difficult or impossible to see without a telescope.
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  • What Is the Surface Temperature on Planets?

    Q: What Is the Surface Temperature on Planets?

    A: The surface temperatures of the solar system's planets are dependent on how close each planet is to the sun. Planets that have atmospheres are better able to retain heat from the sun, affecting the planet's surface temperature.
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  • How Many Miles Is Jupiter From the Sun?

    Q: How Many Miles Is Jupiter From the Sun?

    A: Jupiter is located an average of 483.64 million miles from the sun. The exact distance between Jupiter and the sun varies depending on the location of Jupiter along its orbit.
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  • What Are Some Facts About the Outer Planets in Our Solar System?

    Q: What Are Some Facts About the Outer Planets in Our Solar System?

    A: Outer planets of the solar system are made predominantly of gases. They tend to have many more moons than the inner planets, and outer planets take a shorter period of time to rotate around their axes.
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  • Can Venus Support Life?

    Q: Can Venus Support Life?

    A: There is no evidence of life existing on Venus, and current scientific theories suggest that it is very unlikely that the planet can support life. The planet's high temperature and lack of water are cited as reasons for its hostility to harboring life.
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  • What Are the Diameters of the Planets?

    Q: What Are the Diameters of the Planets?

    A: The diameters of the planets are as follows: Mercury is 3,032 miles; Venus is 7,521 miles; Earth is 7,926 miles; Mars is 4,222 miles; Jupiter is 88,846 miles; Saturn is 74,898 miles; Uranus is 31,763 miles; Neptune is 30,778 miles. As a result, the largest planet by diameter is Jupiter and the smallest is Mercury.
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  • What Planet Has the Longest Year?

    Q: What Planet Has the Longest Year?

    A: As the furthest orbiting planet in the Solar System, Neptune has the longest year, taking 164.8 Earth years to complete a single orbit of the Sun. Prior to its reclassification as a dwarf planet in 2006, Pluto was the planet with the longest year, equal to about 248 Earth years.
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  • How Did Neptune Get Its Name?

    Q: How Did Neptune Get Its Name?

    A: Neptune was given its name by its discoverer, Urbain Le Verrier. Honoring the tradition of naming planets after Roman gods, Le Verrier chose Neptune, who was the Roman sea god. He chose this name because of the blue colors that dominate the planet.
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  • Where Is Mars Located?

    Q: Where Is Mars Located?

    A: Mars is the fourth planet from the sun. Its average distance from the sun is 141,633,120 miles, approximately 1.5 times that of Earth.
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  • Who Named Saturn?

    Q: Who Named Saturn?

    A: Saturn has been observed with the naked eye since prehistoric times, so it is not possible to know who named it first. Roman astronomers named it Saturnus after their god of agriculture and the father of Jove, which translates to Saturn in English.
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  • What Are the Sizes of the Nine Planets?

    Q: What Are the Sizes of the Nine Planets?

    A: The nine planets in the solar system range in size from approximately 3,000 to 140,000 kilometers in diameter. Ranked from smallest to largest the planets are Pluto, Mercury, Mars, Venus, Earth, Neptune, Uranus, Saturn and Jupiter.
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  • What Are the Nicknames for the Planets?

    Q: What Are the Nicknames for the Planets?

    A: Nicknames for the eight planets in the solar system are Swift Planet for Mercury, Morning Star and Evening Star for Venus, Blue Planet for Earth, Red Planet for Mars, Giant Planet for Jupiter, Ringed Planet for Saturn, Ice Giant for Uranus and Big Blue Planet for Neptune. Pluto was once considered a planet and had the nickname Ice Planet, but it is now classified as a dwarf planet.
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  • Where Does It Rain Diamonds?

    Q: Where Does It Rain Diamonds?

    A: Planetary scientists in the United States believe that giant diamond chunks may be floating in the fluid hydrogen and helium atmospheres of Saturn and Jupiter, and that at certain altitudes the chunks melt and rain glittering liquid diamond onto the planets.
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  • What Are the Similarities Between Earth and Neptune?

    Q: What Are the Similarities Between Earth and Neptune?

    A: Although they are quite dissimilar in almost every way, the Earth and Neptune do share some similar qualities such as gravity, color and orbit. With a gravitational pull that is only 14-percent stronger than the Earth's, Neptune and the Earth have similar gravitational pulls. Both planets are blue and both orbit around the Sun.
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