Our Moon

A:

Most people know that the moon's gravitational influence has an effect on the tides on Earth, but some scientists also believe that the presence of the moon played an important role in making Earth habitable to begin with. The interplay between the Earth and the moon mirrors events that occurred throughout the early solar system, as a Mars-sized object may have hit the Earth, sending some of the mantle into orbit that soon cooled into the moon. Over time, the relationship between the Earth and the moon may well have assisted the advent of life.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What objects did astronauts leave on the moon?

    Q: What objects did astronauts leave on the moon?

    A: Thanks to six moon landings, hundreds of objects are still scattered across the surface of the moon: golf balls, boots, cameras, javelins, sculptures, photographs, and a golden olive branch. Because the moon doesn't have an atmosphere, most of these objects will remain preserved until something impacts that area of the moon.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How many times did we land on the moon?

    Q: How many times did we land on the moon?

    A: According to NASA, there have been six lunar landings, all under the Apollo program. The first moon landing was by Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969. The last was Apollo 17, which landed on the moon on December 7, 1972.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the meaning of a yellow moon?

    Q: What is the meaning of a yellow moon?

    A: When the moon appears orange or yellow, it simply means that the observer is looking at it through more layers of atmosphere. Similar to the way in which the sun will look orange or red on the horizon, when the moon is low in the sky, the light from it will have to pass through more of the blue-absorbing atmosphere to reach the viewer's eye. By this time, only yellow, orange and red light will remain unabsorbed.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How many phases does the moon have?

    Q: How many phases does the moon have?

    A: The moon has a total of eight individual phases. Four of these phases are considered to be the moon's main phases. The remaining four phases are considered to be the moon's transitional phases.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Was Neil Armstrong misquoted?

    Q: Was Neil Armstrong misquoted?

    A: Whether Neil Armstrong's famous saying "one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" is a misquote or not seems to be a matter of some debate. NASA authorities at the time claimed he said "one small step for a man" and Armstrong himself has occupied both sides of the debate at different times.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Is the moon bigger than the Earth?

    Q: Is the moon bigger than the Earth?

    A: The moon is not bigger than the Earth as it has a diameter of approximately 2,159 square miles, which is about one-quarter of the size of Earth. In addition to being smaller than the Earth, the moon is much lighter. It weighs approximately 80 times less than Earth, but what it lacks in density, the moon makes up for in luminosity.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What happens during a lunar eclipse?

    Q: What happens during a lunar eclipse?

    A: A lunar eclipse happens when the Earth passes between the moon and the sun. Lunar eclipses cast a shadow on the moon due to the Earth's location. From the perspective of the moon, the Earth completely blocks the sun.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How long does it take the moon to orbit the Earth?

    Q: How long does it take the moon to orbit the Earth?

    A: The Earth's moon takes 27 Earth days to completely orbit the Earth. A day on the moon is also equal to a little over 27 days on Earth.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How old is the moon?

    Q: How old is the moon?

    A: The scientific consensus is that the Earth's moon formed four and half billion years ago. About 100 million years after the formation of the solar system, another small planet is likely to have collided with the Earth, resulting in the formation of the Moon.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why did we go to the moon?

    Q: Why did we go to the moon?

    A: One of the main reasons the United States sponsored a mission to the moon was because of the space race with Russia. Russia was the first country to put an artificial satellite in space, which caused a lot of embarrassment for the U.S.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Can the moon really affect your sleep patterns?

    Q: Can the moon really affect your sleep patterns?

    A: Though scientists find the phenomenon hard to explain, it may be true that people tend to get a little bit less sleep during a full moon, and the sleep they do get is not as deep as it is at other times of the month. While increased nighttime light could be an issue, research showed that the moon impacted subjects' sleep even if they were in a windowless room. However, the European scientists who conducted this study, which was reported in 2013, seem to doubt their own findings.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Can humans live on the moon?

    Q: Can humans live on the moon?

    A: Despite the close relationship between the Earth and its moon as well as successful human visits to the moon, life there is not currently sustainable. The moon doesn't provide enough oxygen for humans to survive. Solar radiation is also a problem, since the moon is outside Earth's protective atmosphere.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How can I tell what phase the moon is in?

    Q: How can I tell what phase the moon is in?

    A: The way to identify which of the phases the moon is in is based on which section of the moon's face is lit by the sun. The moon has eight phases, which happen in the same cycle over the course of a 29-day period.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What went wrong with Apollo 13?

    Q: What went wrong with Apollo 13?

    A: As the source of the iconic phrase, "Houston, we've had a problem," the Apollo 13 mission went from an intended moon landing to a narrowly averted disaster when one of the oxygen tank exploded as the shuttle was en route to the moon. This event occurred on April 14, 1970, three days after the shuttle's launch. After the explosion, the shuttle's crew, consisting of commander Jim Lovell, Jack Swigert and Fred Haise, worked with NASA mission control in Houston, Texas to successfully get themselves back to earth without major injury.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the difference between the Earth and the moon?

    Q: What is the difference between the Earth and the moon?

    A: One of the many differences between the Earth and the moon is simply that the Earth is a planet and the moon orbits the Earth as its satellite. The Earth's circumference is 24,873.6 miles, while that of the moon is 6783.5 miles.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the moon made of?

    Q: What is the moon made of?

    A: The lunar crust is made of 43 percent oxygen, 20 percent silicon, 19 percent magnesium, 10 percent iron, 3 percent calcium and 3 percent aluminum. The moon's core is thought to consist of iron, sulfur and nickel, with the largest middle layer, or mantle, composed of olivine, clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How much would you weigh on the moon?

    Q: How much would you weigh on the moon?

    A: According to the Argonne National Laboratory, a human being weighs approximately one-sixth as much on the moon as he does on Earth. If an individual weighs 180 pounds on Earth, that weight is converted to 30 pounds on the moon.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why do we always see the same face of the moon?

    Q: Why do we always see the same face of the moon?

    A: The moon is tidally locked with Earth, which has the effect of synchronizing its rotation period with the period of its orbit. Completing one "day" per orbit of the Earth, the moon has shown the same face to the Earth for billions of years.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Are blue moons actually blue?

    Q: Are blue moons actually blue?

    A: While the name "blue moon" conjures up a vivid, colorful image, the term actually refers to those times when there are two full moons in a single month; that second full moon is referred to as the blue moon, though its color is likely to be the same as it ever is. It is possible for the moon to have a bluish appearance, but this is usually due to atmospheric changes on earth, such as smoke or ash in the upper atmosphere as the result of fires or volcanic activity.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why does the moon look orange?

    Q: Why does the moon look orange?

    A: Any time the moon appears orange in the sky, it's because of light diffusion and refraction in the atmosphere. When the moon is low in the sky, the blue light reflected from its surface is scattered in the dense atmosphere, giving the moon a reddish-orange cast.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why does the same side of the moon always face Earth?

    Q: Why does the same side of the moon always face Earth?

    A: Though the moon does rotate around its axis, the speed with which it completes these revolutions match the amount of time it takes to orbit around the Earth, leading the same side to be faced toward Earth at all times. This process takes a about month, meaning the moon's days are as long as an Earth month.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: